fbpx
Categories
HOW TO MAKE MONEY ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

Do YouTubers Get Paid for Views?

How YouTubers get paid is often a point of interest for people who are considering getting into the platform.

And, for that matter, many people who have no interest in becoming a YouTuber but nevertheless are curious.

There are, of course, several ways in which a YouTuber can get paid from their channel, and there is plenty of information about the different aspects of YouTuber earnings, many of which you can find on this very blog.

Do YouTubers Get Paid for Views?

So, straight to the meat of the topic. Do YouTubers get paid for views? The answer is a little mixed – YouTube channels need to be part of the YouTube Partner Program to earn money directly from the adverts displayed on their videos. Once a channel has 1000 subscribers, 4000 watch time hours and are accepted into the program they ca earn anywhere between $1-10 per thousand advert views.

There are other YouTubers that do get paid but that choose to operate in ways that don’t earn them money on a per-view basis.

Let’s back up a little.

It’s worth noting that, effectively, all YouTube earnings are based on views one way or another. Even YouTubers who earn their revenue primarily through things like brand deals and crowdfunding need to have enough interest in their content to make money, and that interest is expressed through views. Granted some methods of generating revenue require considerably fewer views to make a given amount of money than others, but it all comes to back to views one way or another.

Still, a channel getting a lucrative brand deal because they have millions of views a month is not what we typically mean when talk about getting paid for views on YouTube. So what do we mean?

The YouTube Partner Programme

We are, of course, talking about monetisation through YouTube’s Partner Programme, which is the most common way that YouTubers monetise their channels—at least in the beginning.

This programme works by displaying ads on your content and, for channels that qualify, splitting the revenue. There are certain criteria that need to be met, such as how long an ad is watched for, or whether the ad was interacted with, but for the most part, the basic rule of more view equals more revenue applies.

Watch Time

Of course, like most things in life, the reality is a little more complex. We’ve already hinted that the amount of time an ad is watched affects whether it earns any money, but when we are talking about revenue per view, the length of the video is also important.

YouTube doesn’t just show one ad on a video, it will cram as many in there as you let it, and the longer the video, the more ads that can be shown. Again, whether the ads get watched is a different matter, but a video that is long enough to show four advertisements has the potential to earn four times as much revenue as one that only shows one ad.

Engagement

Those of you who can read between the lines may already have made this connection, but the natural result of more ads increasing the revenue doesn’t just mean that longer videos have the potential to earn more money, it also means that engagement is important, too.

The crucial point about having that video we mentioned that is long enough to show four times as many advertisements is that those advertisements only earn revenue if they are watched. That means that if a viewer checks out before the second ad, the rest of those ads may as well have not been there for all the good they do.

How Many Views do you Need to Make Money on YouTube?

How is Revenue Calculated?

For view-based revenue on YouTube, there are two central metrics for calculating how money a channel is making; CPM and RPM.

CPM—cost per mille—refers to the amount of money that a channel is making per thousand views. CPM factors all the videos that are eligible for monetisation (and only those videos), which means that you get an average spread in terms of revenue, which is to say that videos that make very little will bring your CPM down, whereas videos that make a lot will bring it up.

CPM does not account for YouTube’s share of the revenue, nor does it factor any of the many other ways which you can make money through the platform, or external to the platform for that matter.

RPM—revenue per mille—is a metric designed to give YouTubers a better sense of how much revenue their channel is making. Like CPM, it refers to the amount of money you are making per thousand views, but unlike CPM, it factors in all views. It also factors in several other sources of revenue (from within the YouTube platform) such as memberships, and super chat.

Revenue Sources YouTube Doesn’t Account For

YouTube can only factor in revenue that you make through their platform, but there are other ways to earn money from the success of your channel.

Let’s take a brief look at some of the more popular ones.

Third Party Subscription and Donations

The most direct way for your viewers to support you is by sending you money, of course.

This can be done through direct donations, such as through PayPal, but it can also be done using platforms like Patreon, which allow your viewers to set up a recurring payment to support your content.

This is essentially the same model that the YouTube Membership system is based on.

Brand Deals and Endorsements

For YouTubers who have a significant influence in a particular area—or just a heck of a lot of subscribers—brand deals and endorsements can become an option.

This is where a company comes to you directly, paying you to endorse a product or service, sponsoring a video.

These deals are typically far more lucrative than anything you would get through the YouTube Partner Programme, but are much harder to get since your channel has to be very successful to get noticed by brands. It is possible to get brand deals as a smaller channel, but you generally have to be a big player in a specific niche for that to happen.

Affiliate Marketing

For YouTubers whose content lends itself well to affiliate marketing, tying in your content to a relevant affiliate program can be a great way to increase the revenue your channel earns.

The most common example of this is YouTube channels that review or highlight products sharing Amazon Affiliate links to those products in their descriptions.

How to Increase Revenue Per Views

Though there is no one-size-fits-all solution, we can boil down the keys to success to a few significant points. Firstly, focus on watch time and engagement. The longer your videos are, and the more watch time they accumulate, the more revenue they will have the chance to generate.

There are also ways to direct your content so that it is more likely to earn more money. Generally speaking, targeting niches that have a high click through rate, or that get bid on highly by advertisers, will mean that your videos generate more money per view.

Beyond that, though it no doubt feels like a bit of a cop out, the best advice for increasing the revenue of your channel is to focus on the content and make the best videos you can. High quality content is the foundation upon which successful channels are built, and starting with a good foundation will always give you a better chance of success in the long run.

How Much is a View Worth on Average?

As we have hopefully made clear, there is no fixed amount we can give, but for a rough idea of how much a view is worth, the average ad view on YouTube will make somewhere between $0.01 and $0.03.

This is, of course, subject to any criteria regarding how long the ad is watched for. Ads that are watched for less than a given amount of time will not earn the channel any money.

If this number seems a little low, it generally is considered to be, which is why YouTube Partner Programme earnings are rarely deemed a good method to base your entire income on.

Final Thoughts

Trying to put a solid number on something like YouTube earnings is a losing battle; there are simply too many variables that can change that number.

And, while YouTubers can often calculate their earnings as a per view metric, the reality of those earnings is often considerably more complicated, with revenue coming from several different places, and at a far from consistent rate.

If you are becoming a YouTuber with revenue generation being the primary goal, it will help to shape your channel from the very beginning with that in mind; focusing on appropriate niches, making content that lends itself well to earning money.

If you are joining YouTube for the love of making content, however, just focus on that to begin with, and figure the rest out as you go along.

Categories
TIPS & TRICKS

How Much Do YouTubers Make an Hour?

Let’s kick things off by potentially ruining your appetite for this post; we’re not going to be able to give you a definite answer to the question of how much do YouTubers make an hour. There are simply too many variables that are completely different from YouTuber to YouTuber, including how we decide to slice up the time YouTubers spend plying their craft.

Before you click away, however, here’s what we can tell you.

In this post we are going to look at how YouTubers make their money, and how those methods can translate to a kind of hourly rate. One thing that will become apparent is that YouTubing revenue does not lend itself well to being easily quantified.

Why is it Hard to Calculate an Hourly Rate for YouTubers?

Hourly rates are easy to calculate when you have a regular job. You know how much you get paid, you how many hours you work, you divide one by the other, and you have your hourly rate.

YouTubers may know how much money they are getting paid (though even that can be a little complicated) but knowing how many hours they are working is much more difficult.

Take your average new YouTuber who gets started around a full time job, school, or other commitments. They will have to make time around those commitments to work on their channel, and this often leads to things like doing a little in the morning, perhaps an hour after work, getting some editing in once the kids are asleep.

This already makes things difficult to measure, but then take into account the fact that not everybody sets aside blocks of time for dedicated YouTube work. We often get distracted from time to time, perhaps checking email, or watching a quick video.

YouTube Tips for Teachers 4

When is it YouTube Work?

Further complicating matters is the range of things that can be considered to be part of running a YouTube channel.

We can unambiguously say that writing, filming, and editing a video is YouTube work, but what about participating in social media? Sure, directly promoting your latest videos on social media is part of your YouTube work, but just being active in a related community will also help your channel… is it work if you do it for fun?

After all, many of us start YouTube channels about things we like, it makes sense that you would be active in communities about those things as well.

Another example of blurred lines in this regard is a YouTube musician. If your channel is based around you playing guitar, for example, then technically speaking, any time you spend practising that guitar is beneficial for your channel. As you can see, keeping “YouTube work” separate from other things isn’t always easy.

Revenue Sources

Determining which revenue sources are a result of YouTube is not quite as difficult as separating out the time you spend working on your channel, but the erratic nature of that revenue can make it hard to put a consistent number on.

Let’s start with YouTube Partner Programme earnings. This is simple enough; any revenue you earn through ads on your channel is definitely YouTube revenue. But even this can be inconsistent, as any YouTuber who has been on the wrong side of an adpocalypse will tell you.

Then there are other sources of revenue, such as merchandise sales, affiliate links, and brand deals. None of these are consistent, which means you have to factor in long periods to get an accurate hourly rate because it can change quite dramatically from week to week and month to month.

Revenue Differences Between YouTubers

From the perspective of an outsider looking in—that is, someone trying to get an idea of how much YouTubers earn—another factor complicating things is the substantial differences from YouTuber to YouTuber.

For one thing, most YouTubers don’t make anything from their channel, which makes their hourly rate quite simple to calculate. On the other end of the scale, there are YouTubers who earn money through the YouTube Partner Programme, get brand deals, sell merch, have membership subscriptions, and more.

YouTubers like that will have a much more impressive looking hourly rate than a YouTuber who just relies on the YouTube Partner Programme.

But even YouTubers with similar viewing figures who only make their money through the Partner Programme can have vastly different hourly rates, as the type of content—and, as a result, the type of ads—can make a huge difference to how much a view is worth.

Improving the Hourly Rate

There are two ways to improve the amount of money you make per hour; make more money, or take less time. The amount of money you make is tied to the success of your channel, and a topic worth a dedicated post of its own.

Reducing the amount of time you spend working on your channel, however, is not one of the more talked about aspects of YouTubing, though it can be just as invaluable.

are some tips for reducing the amount of time you need to spend on your channel.

Get Better!

The more you improve at your craft, the easier it will be and the less time you will have to spend on things like additional takes, reshoots, and excessive editing.

An accomplished YouTuber can often make more polished, entertaining content in considerably less time than an inexperienced YouTuber.

As the old saying goes; practice makes perfect. The idea of “practice” is often misunderstood, however. It is not enough to simply do a thing, you have to be striving to improve at that thing. If you just go through the same motions each time, you won’t get any better overall. Actively try to learn more about the software you use, including tips and tricks for making your workflow more efficient.

It is often the case that just learning keyboard shortcuts for your editing software can cut the time spent editing down by as much as half!

YouTube Tips for Parents 1

Have a System

If you go into every video winging it from start to finish, you will invariably find yourself doing a lot more editing and reshooting. For those of you who like to turn the camera on and talk, we’re not saying you should start scripting your videos; keep that improvised format if it works for you.

When we say have a system, we mean develop ways to make your life easier. One example of this would be an audio or visual cue for an edit point. This could be a whistle or clap that will be clearly visible in the waveform of your audio in your editor, and will save you having to hunt around for spots you know will need cutting out.

Other examples include things like having templates for your videos and thumbnails, and having your recording setup either permanent or any settings written down, so you don’t have to spend time getting everything set up each time your record.

Anything you can do to streamline your recording and editing process without sacrificing the quality of your content will effectively improve your hourly rate as a YouTuber.

Focus

It can be very easy to develop scatterbrain when running a YouTube channel. Most YouTubers are creative by nature, and with a world of tools and resources at your disposal, the temptation to drift into other niches and video types can be tempting. Now, we’re not saying you should never do this—in fact, in the long term it is advisable to do this as it will help keep your channel fresh—but while you are finding your feet as a YouTuber, it is better to keep focussed and concentrate on doing one thing really well, rather than a doing a dozen things just okay.

Don’t Get Hung Up On Numbers

While things like how much money you are making and how many views you are getting are a good indicator of whether you are going in the right direction as a YouTuber, it is important not to live or die by those numbers.

A huge range of things can affect your numbers, like seasonal changes (fewer people watching YouTube while the sun is out, for example) and trends. Even a highly successful channel will see what looks like flat spots in their growth at one time or another, but if you panic when this happens, you risk making bad decisions that can lead to actual stalling or backsliding.

Final Thoughts

So, calculating the hourly rate of your average YouTuber: not so simple. Even calculating your own hourly rate as a YouTuber is difficult enough!

If you are attempting to work out if YouTube is a viable career move, or if you are currently successful enough on YouTube to go full time, it is important to take a large sample of revenue numbers into account.

You don’t want to quit your day job after a couple of really profitable months on YouTube, only to find they were just a spike and your revenue takes a nose dive the following month.

Categories
HOW TO MAKE MONEY ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

Do YouTubers Still Get Paid for Old Videos?

One of the most appealing aspects of a career as YouTuber is the potential for passive income.

Passive income is something of a holy grail for many, as it essentially represents free money. It’s not “free”, of course, but it can feel like it.

Passive income is what you get when you put time, effort, money, or any combination of those things into something, and that thing continues earning you money long after you’re done, with little-to-no effort on your part.

The most basic example of this would be a savings account—you put money into the savings account, and it accrues interest while you do nothing. The more money you put in, the more interest you earn. Now, granted, the amount of money you would need to make your living from savings account interest is probably in the millions of dollars, but the concept is the same.

Another example is being a landlord.

You put the work in to buy a property and get tenants, and then you sit back and collect rent. As these two examples should illustrate, passive income can have varying levels of involvement. Savings accounts require nothing from you after your investment, whereas tenants may require a lot.

So, how does this relate to YouTube?

Well, YouTube represents a potential passive income source thanks to the fact that your videos, once uploaded and published, remain there for the world to see for as long as you choose to leave them up.

But do YouTubers still get paid for old videos? If those videos are monetized and earning money, then they can be a passive income source. The larger the back catalogue the more videos you have for YouTube to suggest and advertise against. 

You could do some additional work, of course, but more on that later.

Youtube Community Tab: What It Is And How To Use It To Grow Your Channel. 19

YouTube Partners

This is only a small point so we won’t dwell on it, but it’s one that many people looking in on YouTube from the outside are unaware of. In order for a YouTuber to make any money through their channel directly, they need to be part of the YouTube Partner Programme – as fully explained in my deep dive blog.

This applies to any YouTuber no matter how long they have been on the platform or how successful they have been in the past.

In particular, the restriction of at least 4,000 hours watch time over the previous twelve months could cause problems for a dead channel (assuming the owner still cares about the revenue it generates), since a channel that has been inactive for long enough may drop below this threshold, and potentially removed from the partner program.

In such a case, the relevance of their old videos would not make a difference, since the videos would not be earning money, to begin with.

That being said, if a channel’s watch time has dropped to less than 4,000 hours a year, the amount of money it would likely have generated would have been insignificant.

Evergreen Content

The key to longevity in your old video’s earning power is evergreen content—this is the name given to content that has lasting relevance. An example of evergreen content might be a lifehack video that shows a very useful trick that is just as effective years later as it was the day you uploaded it.

On the other hand, an example of decidedly not evergreen content would be a video on celebrity gossip. In an age of 24-hour news cycles and constant social media exposure, such a video could be out of date before the end of the day it was uploaded!

When trying to make evergreen content, take your time to fully explore the future of your video idea. Something like a current events news video is obviously going to have a limited shelf life, but tutorials and lifehacks aren’t guaranteed longevity, either.

For example, videos on clever techniques for improving your guitar skills might never lose their relevance—the only potential enemy there would be other videos coming along and doing it better.

But a video on how to improve the performance on a particular model of phone may have a very limited shelf life depending on when that phone will next be superseded, and how quickly it will fall out of favour with the consumers.

Demonetisation

Another thing to think about when considering the lasting earning power of older videos is the changing landscape of YouTube monetisation.

In particular, the many adpocalypses that have taken place—where YouTube have changed policies that have resulted in many videos being demonetised—as well the constant trend of giving copyright holders more power to claim your content for their own over the smallest infringements, or mistaken claims.

Through this mechanism, videos that may have been happily earning a regular income for years could be instantly cut off due to some change in YouTube’s policies. In some cases, you may be able to appeal such a decision or make a minor change that will remove the infringement, but it will require action on your part.

In many cases, it would not be just one video that is demonetised, with past adpocalypses seeing some highly successful channels getting most of their back catalogue demonetised overnight.

Do YouTubers Still Get Paid for Old Videos?

What About Dead Channels?

A dead channel is a channel where the YouTuber has stopped uploading content and has given no indication that they intend to resume in the future. As we touched on above, this doesn’t necessarily mean the end of that channel’s earning potential—at least not immediately.

As long as the channel continues to meet the criteria for the YouTube Partner Programme, any eligible videos will continue to earn money.

Remember, one of the requirements for being part of the partner program is having an AdSense account, so as long that AdSense account is active, the money will keep funnelling into it. And, if a channel owner closes their AdSense account, that channel will no longer be eligible to be part of the YouTube Partner Programme.

Eventually, though, a dead channel’s views will dwindle over time. Some channels may have a lot of staying power after the YouTuber has deserted it—after all, YouTube is only fifteen years old, it hasn’t been around long enough to truly know—but there is no such thing as a video that remains relevant forever.

There will always be new information to make it less relevant, or new videos to supersede it.

Can YouTubers Control Which Ads Are Shown? 6

Algorithm Boost

On the opposite side of that losing relevance coin is the fabled algorithm boost.

It has become a matter of memedom in the comments of many YouTube videos how the YouTube recommendation algorithm can be a little… eccentric, at times.

Of course, the people in those comments generally seem to feel the algorithm made a solid recommendation as they enjoyed the video, but that doesn’t make it any less strange that someone in the middle of a binge of dozens of chiropractic back cracking videos might suddenly get a recommendation for a short video showing a cameraman outrunning the lead runner in a sprint race he is filming.

Incidentally, we know that video is taken from a commercial for a sports drink, but the point stands.

The YouTube algorithm works in weird and wonderful ways, and many YouTubers have found themselves logging into their account to find thousands, even hundreds of thousands of extra views as a result of an unexpected algorithm boost.

Some channels are even launched off of the back such a boost.

Channels that have been stagnant for some time—or have only been managing a very small amount of growth—get a sudden jolt from the YouTube algorithm and go on to be incredibly successful, with that boost as a clear turning point.

Of course, if you intend to build a passive income out of your YouTube channel, you can’t rely on an algorithm boost that, quite frankly, probably won’t come. It is much better to focus on making your channel useful and relevant and growing it naturally.

That way, if it does get a bit of a bump from YouTube, it will be a pleasant surprise.

Or you could try to revive an old video with better SEO, a new title and an eye catching thumbnail – I use VidIQ to boost my old YouTube videos and you can install it for free on their website!

What Kinds of Content Have Lasting Relevance?

It should go without saying that there is no single absolute key to success here. If there was, everybody would be doing it.

As mentioned above, a how-to video on a piece of technology that could be out of date in six months and largely out of use in a year or two is not a good candidate for an evergreen video, but how-to videos, in general, are excellent.

With that in mind, here are some of the most common types of evergreen content you might find on YouTube.

How To Make A Playlist on YouTube & Why? (with Pictures)

How-To/Tutorial Videos

Practical knowledge never goes out of style. As we’ve mentioned, the thing you are teaching may lose relevance, but you can always plan to avoid such things.

For example, I make YouTube tips and tricks videos explaining everything you need to know about YouTube. This provides useful tips that rarely age and can rank well on search engines.

Maybe you want to make tips and tricks for optimising a mobile phone operating system like Android may not be the best route, since a new version of that operating system is released on a yearly basis. On the other hand, desktop operating systems tend to have a much longer lifespan, with Windows being roughly 4-7 years.

It doesn’t have to be technology, of course.

General life hacks are also popular, as well as how-to videos for useful, practical things that people might need. And, as an added bonus, this type of video is more likely to hold relevance for a much longer time.

If you make a video about the latest game console, it will only be relevant as long as people are using that console, but a video about making jam or repairing a wooden chair will be as relevant in five years as it is today.

Is It Legal to Make YouTube Videos from Books? 4

Educational Content

Another type of video that is good for evergreen content is educational content.

The exact subject matter isn’t necessarily important; it could be a video on ancient Greece, a guide on how to do algebra or an interesting look into the formation of mountains. The good thing about educational content is that it rarely loses its relevance.

Granted, new discoveries are made by historians from time to time, and scientific discoveries happen on a fairly regular, but for the most part, unless you are making videos on the bleeding edge of quantum physics or cutting edge medical science, the chances are your content will hold its relevance for a long time.

Maths and history are particularly useful for this, since paradigm-changing discoveries in historical circles are relatively rare, and much of maths remains the same today as it has for centuries.

You could also branch out into more advanced topics, such as foreign languages, programming, and bushcraft.

Granted, some of these videos straddle a line between education and how-to videos, but it doesn’t really matter what exact category your content falls under as long as it does the job you want it to.

Is It Legal to Make YouTube Videos from Books? 2

Informational Videos

Again, we might be straddling the line of educational content with this one, but informational videos—as long as they are accurate—are also good for maintaining relevance.

An example of this might be a video on how you apply for a building permit in a particular state, or what the law is regarding street performing. It could also be a deep dive on how a particular type of building has to be constructed in order to not fall over.

The basic premise here is that you are providing useful information, so the information must be accurate if you are to catch and retain an audience, which is key to YouTube seeing your channel as an authoritative source and recommending your content in future.

That means keeping up to date with whatever topic you are sharing information about.

If the information changes, you will need to update your content, since leaving incorrect information on a channel that is supposed to be providing accurate information will harm that channel’s reputation.

Conclusions

So, do YouTubers still get paid for old videos? As long as a YouTuber has content that was earning money in the first place, and that content has lasting relevance that viewers will still be searching for long after the upload date, that YouTuber can still earn money from their older videos.

Their channel has to be eligible to earn money, and their videos have to have not fallen victim to any copyright claims or adpocalypse fallout, which can pose a problem for a lot of older content.

But for a YouTuber with a substantial back catalogue and a willingness to fix any potential infractions of YouTube policies, old videos can be an excellent way of earning a passive income from the work you have already put in.

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube

Very quickly before you go here are 5 amazing tools I have used every day to grow my YouTube channel from 0 to 30K subscribers in the last 12 months that I could not live without.

1. VidIQ helps boost my views and get found in search

I almost exclusively switched to VidIQ from a rival in 2020.

Within 12 months I tripled the size of my channel and very quickly learnt the power of thumbnails, click through rate and proper search optimization. Best of all, they are FREE!

2. Adobe Creative Suite helps me craft amazing looking thumbnails and eye-catching videos

I have been making youtube videos on and off since 2013.

When I first started I threw things together in Window Movie Maker, cringed at how it looked but thought “that’s the best I can do so it’ll have to do”.

Big mistake!

I soon realized the move time you put into your editing and the more engaging your thumbnails are the more views you will get and the more people will trust you enough to subscribe.

That is why I took the plunge and invested in my editing and design process with Adobe Creative Suite. They offer a WIDE range of tools to help make amazing videos, simple to use tools for overlays, graphics, one click tools to fix your audio and the very powerful Photoshop graphics program to make eye-catching thumbnails.

Best of all you can get a free trial for 30 days on their website, a discount if you are a student and if you are a regular human being it starts from as little as £9 per month if you want to commit to a plan.

3. Rev.com helps people read my videos

You can’t always listen to a video.

Maybe you’re on a bus, a train or sat in a living room with a 5 year old singing baby shark on loop… for HOURS. Or, you are trying to make as little noise as possible while your new born is FINALLY sleeping.

This is where Rev can help you or your audience consume your content on the go, in silence or in a language not native to the video.

Rev.com can help you translate your videos, transcribe your videos, add subtitles and even convert those subtitles into other languages – all from just $1.50 per minute.

A GREAT way to find an audience and keep them hooked no matter where they are watching your content.

4. PlaceIT can help you STAND OUT on YouTube

I SUCK at making anything flashy or arty.

I have every intention in the world to make something that looks cool but im about as artistic as a dropped ice-cream cone on the web windy day.

That is why I could not live on YouTube without someone like PlaceIT. They offer custom YouTube Banners, Avatars, YouTube Video Intros and YouTube End Screen Templates that are easy to edit with simple click, upload wizard to help you make amazing professional graphics in minutes.

Best of all, some of their templates are FREE! or you can pay a small fee if you want to go for their slightly more premium designs (pst – I always used the free ones).

5. StoryBlocks helps me add amazing video b-roll cutaways

I mainly make tutorials and talking head videos.

And in this modern world this can be a little boring if you don’t see something funky every once in a while.

I try with overlays, jump cuts and being funny but my secret weapon is b-roll overlay content.

I can talk about skydiving, food, money, kids, cats – ANYTHING I WANT – with a quick search on the StoryBlocks website I can find a great looking clip to overlay on my videos, keeping them entertained and watching for longer.

They have a wide library of videos, graphics, images and even a video maker tool and it wont break the bank with plans starting from as little as £8.25 ($9) per month.

Categories
SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS & TRICKS VIDEO YOUTUBE

HOW TO MAKE MONEY ON YOUTUBE — HOW TO BECOME A YOUTUBER (EP 06)

HOW TO MAKE MONEY ON YOUTUBE — HOW TO BECOME A YOUTUBER (EP 06) // Making money on YouTube can help you grow a brand and invest in equipment. To make money on YouTube you need a mix of income sources — YouTube Partnership, Affiliate Marketing Links, Sponsorship, Product Sales, Merchandise and more.

HOW TO BECOME A YOUTUBER SERIES PLAYLIST — https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHIkhNXEdWQ&list=PL09mwoOn57VSuTnztdl8MLEawAEgE3rx_

#YouTubeTips #YouTubeTutorials #Tutorials #YouTube #FAQs #YouTuberProblems #StartCreating #HowTo #AlanSpicer #Education #Learning #Help

MERCH — T-SHIRTS, MUGS, PILLOWS ETC — http://www.AlanSpicer.com/shop

► SUBSCRIBE FOR REGULAR YOUTUBE TIPS & TRICKS — https://goo.gl/oeZvZr ◄

SUGGESTED PLAYLISTS
=============================
▶️ Top YouTube Hacks — https://goo.gl/uB89Ap
✅ How To Get More Subscribers — https://goo.gl/7MVKPp
▶️ How To Optimise and Tag Your Videos — https://goo.gl/Tg9rd2
✅ How To Get More Views — https://goo.gl/AELTtm
▶️ IGTV Instagram TV Tutorial — https://goo.gl/Vi7pNc
✅ 10 YouTuber Secrets to Success — https://goo.gl/jWdcQd
▶️ How To Live Stream on YouTube — https://goo.gl/ToVrFJ

IMPORTANT LINKS
=============================
✅ FREE YOUTUBE TIPS eBOOK/PDF — https://goo.gl/E1LC43
▶️ SUGGESTED EQUIPMENT — http://amzn.to/2sBAs2Q
✅ TUBEBUDDY — http://www.alanspicer.com/tubebuddy
🔴 LOOKING FOR 1on1 COACHING? — https://goo.gl/ibQuk9

YOUTUBE TIPS & YOUTUBER SUPPORT GROUP — https://www.facebook.com/groups/1887378077953745/

MY YOUTUBE SET UP
=============================
▶️ LIGHTING & BACK DROPS — https://amzn.to/2Hzr3N5
✅ DAYLIGHT WHITE 5500K BULBS — https://amzn.to/2r1F0fO
▶️ 64GB MEMORY CARD — https://amzn.to/2I0YucB
✅ LOGITECH C920 1080P WEBCAM — https://amzn.to/2HyfvKi
▶️ RING LIGHT — https://amzn.to/2r61lsS
✅ BUDGET CAMERA — CANON 1300D — https://amzn.to/2r0YuBV
▶️ DREAM CAMERA — NIKON D3300 — https://amzn.to/2HZ9hnv
🔴 SUGGESTED EQUIPMENT — http://amzn.to/2sBAs2Q

NEED HELP GET IN TOUCH — Alan@HD1WebDesign.com

We can grow together, We can learn together… Start Creating!

► THANKS FOR WATCHING PLEASE REMEMBER TO LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE AND SUBSCRIBE — https://goo.gl/oeZvZr ◄

Note — Some of my links will be affiliate marketing links. These links do not affect the price of the products or services referred to but may offer commissions that are used to help me to fund the free YouTube video tutorials on this channel — thank you for your support.