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MARKETING SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

YouTube Channel Art Size

Presentation is everything, and your channel art can play a huge role in how potential new viewers perceive your channel.

If you are running a channel aimed at businesses, having unprofessional-looking channel art could put your target audience off. Similarly, if you are running a comedy channel, your channel shouldn’t look too formal.

On a more fundamental level, having your art be too small will affect the quality it displays at, making it blurry and generally giving the impression that you perhaps don’t care about your channel. There are other factors to consider, such as the placement of your art within the overall image, and how it will display on various different platforms. Remember, YouTube can be watched on a plethora of devices these days, from desktop computers to television sets to mobile phones.

YouTube Channel Art Size

So what should your YouTube channel art size be? Well, there are a few figures to take into account here;

  • 2560 x 1440 is the recommended dimensions of your YouTube channel art. Remember; YouTube makes these recommendations for a reason, and you really should treat this as an ideal size.
  • 2048 x 1152 is the minimum resolution you should make your channel art image. Below this size and YouTube will not allow you to upload it. The aspect ratio must be 16:9.
  • 1546 x 423 is the safe zone for any critical parts of your channel art if you are using the recommended YouTube channel art size. If you are using the minimum size, the safe zone would be 1235 x 338. What this means is that anything you want viewers to be able to see, you should keep within an imaginary rectangle of this size that is centered within the overall channel art image. Anything outside of this safe zone may get cut off or hidden on various devices. That is not to say you shouldn’t put any effort into the rest of the channel art, but don’t put anything outside of that area if it is vital that it be seen, such as social media info, or schedules.
  • 6MB is the maximum file size your channel art can be. Anything larger and YouTube won’t accept it. You can, however, upload smaller channel art images.

If you need some examples of what a YouTube channel banner can look like I have pulled together a list of some of the best, worst and weirdest youtube channel banners in my blog.

The part that can be tricky to wrap your mind around is the different platforms, and how the sizes apply to each. So let’s take a look at that.

How Channel Art Displays on Different Devices

For the rest of the article, we’re going to assume we are working with the recommended YouTube channel art size. If your channel art is a different size, you will have to scale the dimensions we discuss to suit.

The first device we are going to talk about is TV. Televisions—or, more accurately, devices that use the YouTube app designed for televisions—are the only ones where the full 2560×1440 will show. Televisions tend to have a lower pixel density due to being much larger screens, which may explain why YouTube treats it more as a background than a header on this platform.

For every other device, there is one crucial number to remember; 423. This is the height of the displayed area of your channel art regardless of the platform it is being shown on. The width, on the other hand, depends on the device. The maximum width that will be displayed on desktops is the full 2560, whereas the maximum on a tablet, like an iPad, is 1855. For mobile phones, it is 1546. It is also worth noting that the desktop size is scalable, and can be anywhere between the maximum 2560 and the minimum 1546.

And this is the reason there is a safe zone of 1546 x 423, because that area of the channel art will be shown regardless of the device, so it is the only part of the channel art you can guarantee will be seen no matter what platform the channel is being viewed on. You can, of course, put whatever you want outside of that safe zone, but be aware that some people may not see it. And, given that mobile phones are among the most popular devices to view YouTube on, there is a very good chance anyone looking at your channel will only be seeing that minimum safe zone.

YouTube Channel Art Size 1

What Should I Put in my Channel Art’s Safe Zone?

Now you know which part of your channel art can be relied on to always show, what should you put in there? The answer to that is one that deserves a post of its own, as there are many ways to play the channel art game. You could have a humorous slogan, a matter of fact statement about what the channel does, an upload schedule, or really anything.

One solid piece of advice for what you should be showing in the safe zone of your channel art is information that accurately conveys what your channel is about. At the top of the post, we mentioned a formal, business-orientated channel having unprofessional channel art not being a great idea, and that about sums up this advice. Try to accurately represent your channel at every level, not just in any words that are said in the channel art, but in the tone of the image.

It’s not uncommon to see social media information in YouTube channel art, but don’t assume it’s right for your channel art automatically. Remember, there are no links in your channel art. If you are going to include your Twitter or Instagram, you will have to write out username on that platform in the channel art. If it is a long and complicated handle, it may not be the best fit. You can always link to them in the header links that YouTube lets you place on your channel page.

How to Set YouTube Channel Art?

Setting the art for your channel is extremely easy. Firstly, make sure you are logged in to YouTube and head over to your channel. You should see a “customize channel” button in the top right-hand side, just under the channel art. If you are on a phone or tablet, you are looking for a little cogwheel icon instead, but the location should be roughly the same.

Once you have clicked that you should be presented with a screen that looks like your channel with the exception that hovering over different elements of your channel page reveals a little pencil edit icon. Clicking on one of those icons will allow you to edit the element in question, so head on up to the channel art and click on the edit icon in the top right-hand corner of it.

From here, you can choose to upload a new image, select one your previous headers in “Your photos”, or choose something from the gallery that YouTube offers. Once you’ve chosen an image—assuming it is not too small in dimensions or too large in file size—you can then crop it to suit, click done, and that’s all there is to it.

How do I Change my Channel’s Icon?

Since your channel is tied to a Google account, you have to go there to change your channel icon. It can help to understand why this process is the way it is if you think of the channel icon as more like a user profile picture.

Fortunately, getting to the right place to change this icon is not that difficult. If you are logged in, you should be able to go to your channel hover over the channel icon, which will reveal a little camera icon. Clicking that will take you where you need to go, allowing you to upload a new image. If it doesn’t show up straight away, don’t worry. Sometimes it can take a little time to update on other services, and YouTube technically counts as a different service to Google.

Branding

It can be easy to overlook branding on YouTube, particularly if you are not the kind of YouTuber that thinks in terms of marketing.

It is worth wrapping your mind around the concept of branding; however, as it can make a significant impact on your channel.

If possible, try to incorporate a consistent theme to your online presence. It may be a logo or icon, but a colour scheme works surprisingly well, too.

The goal is to have viewers associate your branding with good content so that, when they see it in other places, they recognise it almost immediately as something they will like. It is much easier to pick up on a particular combination of colours that you are familiar with than it is to remember the name or recognise the face of someone you are not familiar with.

Once your branding is established in the mind of a viewer, it will draw their attention in thumbnails, and any other places your branding appears. And, as many of you will know, getting a viewers attention is a significant part of the battle. Once you have them looking at your thumbnail and title, you are well on your way to getting a view.

And, of course, your channel art is one of the primary places to show that branding. It doesn’t necessarily have to be the centrepiece of your channel art—though it certainly can be if you prefer—but it should be incorporated. From there, you can go on to include it in other places, but the main area you should try and tie in is your thumbnail because that is the spot where your branding will be recognised the most, and where you will be able to attract the attention of those who are familiar with you.

It’s worth noting that branding sentiment can work against you if your content is good. Viewers will associate your branding with the experience they had watching your content. And, if the experience was bad, that is the emotion that your branding will conjure up. As always, good content is fundamental to success on YouTube.

Other Uses for Channel Art

Your YouTube channel art doesn’t have to be a one-trick pony. In fact, as mentioned in the branding talk above, it would actually be better if it wasn’t just used on your channel page. Using your channel art in other places helps with that branding, but it also allows you to focus extra time or money on making one good piece of channel art without worrying about having to do the same for other places.

Some of those other places include the header image on social media sites, artwork for things like stickers, and even overlays for streams. Of course, a purpose-made YouTube channel art image won’t necessarily drop into all of these roles without any effort. In the case of social media headers, you should be able to get away with just cropping the image to suit, but there may be a bit more work involved with something like a stream overlay.

Conclusions

The ideal YouTube channel art size can be seen as something of a misnomer, given that YouTube has a minimum size and will not allow you to upload channel art that is smaller than that. Still, the difference between the minimum size and the recommended size is enough that you could see significant degradation of your channel art if it is stretched to fit wider screens. For that reason, we would always recommend uploading your channel art at the recommended 2560×1440 resolution.

You can, of course, create a larger channel art image; however, the cropping process that your image goes through after upload will produce an image of the size YouTube wants regardless of what size it was going in, so you none of that extra resolution will make it to your channel page. That being said, it can’t hurt to have a higher resolution version of your channel art available. It could come in handy for things like printing on merchandise. And, of course, with screen resolutions continually increasing, the day will come when YouTube decide to increase their recommended channel art sizes.

Now, if you’re ready to get making your channel art, there are plenty of tools to help you make excellent channel art, not to mention services to make your life easier, and resources to help you learn.

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Does YouTube Have an Affiliate Program?

Affiliate programs are one of the most popular ways of earning money online; whether it is as a nice side-hustle for a little extra cash or the backbone of a five-figure a month income, they provide a way to earn revenue while doing the things you are already doing.

They can invisibly add additional revenue streams that, in some cases, can even add value for your viewers.

With all of this in mind, it is natural to wonder; does YouTube have an affiliate program of their own.

After all, being profitable is a serious concern for the platform, not to mention the added incentive it would give to content creators.

Does YouTube have an affiliate program? – No, YouTube does not have an affiliate program, but you can monetize your channel with the Partnership Program if/when you meet the 1K subscribers and 4K hours of watch time requirements. However you can still use external affiliate programs to make money on YouTube with click through traffic.

We’re about to take an in-depth look at affiliate programs and how you can use them on YouTube, so let’s get comfortable.

How Many Views do you Need to Make Money on YouTube?

What is an Affiliate Program?

If you’ve made it this far into the post without knowing what an affiliate program is, don’t worry; we’ve got your back. An affiliate program is a system whereby you can earn a fee in exchange for actions taken by your viewers. With the most popular forms of affiliate programs, this fee often comes in the form a commission of a product or service sale. In some cases, it can be a fixed fee in exchange for a user signing up to something.

By far, the most popular affiliate program for individual YouTubers—and many other content creators—is the Amazon Affiliate program, which allows you to generate a unique link for any product on the Amazon marketplace. If one of your viewers clicks through your link and buys something, you earn a small percentage of the sale.

The other way in which affiliate programs are typically run is when a service that is looking for members will reward people who refer new users to them. Fiverr is an excellent example of this with its affiliate program explicitly designed to reward people for driving traffic to their service.

If you want a hugely in-depth deep dive into how to get started with affiliate marketing, best ways to leverage affiliate marketing and my 10+ years of experience in generating income with affiliate marketing – check out my Affiliate Marketing for Beginners blog post.

Do YouTubers Get Paid Monthly?

Why YouTube Doesn’t Have an Affiliate Program

Once you understand how affiliate programs work, it should be easy to understand why YouTube doesn’t have one.

First of all, they don’t sell any products, so they can’t offer a commission on the sale of those products. But secondly, there is no paid service to subsidise a traffic-driving affiliate program like the one Fiverr has. Granted, there is YouTube Premium, but that is a very narrowly focussed product that would not have much re-use value for any given YouTuber.

With a platform like Fiverr, there are dozens and dozens of different services available, so one person could theoretically want to keep going back, which in turn means there are far more ways in which an affiliate link can be worked into the content that is being created.

As for the non-YouTube Premium content, it doesn’t make much sense for YouTube to incentivise people to drive traffic to their platform, given the sheer number of people who are on that platform attempting to drive to traffic to their own videos already.

YouTube is all about retention—once a new person lands on their site, they aim to keep them there as long as possible, and they’ve gotten very good at that over the years.

It doesn’t matter if it’s a popular YouTube who drives millions of unique views a day to the site, or an unknown YouTuber who is just starting out who might bring three new sets of eyeballs to the platform, YouTube will work to keep those people on the site viewing videos, and that retention just as valuable—if not more so—than bringing in new viewers who might not be so interested in sticking around.

YouTube Tips for Teachers 4

Tips for Using Affiliate Marketing with your YouTube Channel

So, YouTube doesn’t have an affiliate marketing program, that much we’ve made clear.

But what we also made clear was the fact that this doesn’t stop you from running affiliate marketing programs through your YouTube channel in order to increase your revenue, so let’s talk about that.

The strength of affiliate marketing lies in invisibility—when you can provide a link to a service or product that fits seamlessly into your content and provides your viewers with something of value to them, you are on to a winner.

To help you achieve affiliate success, we’ve put together some of our top tips for using affiliate programs in your videos and on your channel.

Full Disclosure

We live in a cynical age, borne of many web services and content creators taking advantage of their audience, more and more people assume that anytime something is hidden from them, it is for negative reasons.

To that end, you should always be upfront about any affiliate links you use, even if all you do is put “(PAID)” next to the link in your description. YouTube viewers are generally accepting of the fact that their content creators need to make money somehow, and will not go out of their way to stop that from happening.

But including affiliate links without disclosing this fact can breed bad blood with your audience—especially if you are reviewing a product or service that you are linking out to through an affiliate program.

Keep it in Context

Google puts a lot of time and effort into figuring out the best ads to show a particular individual at any given time.

This is because merely showing the ad is only part of the battle—if nobody ever clicked those ads, advertisers would stop paying for them.

The same approach should be taken for affiliate links. There is no sense in making a video about guitar building and then including an affiliate link to an eBook on making money online.

Sure, some of the viewers of that video might be interested in the eBook, but it is such a shot in the dark, it would hardly be worth the effort of typing the link.

While we’re not saying there is never a good time for an out of context affiliate link, the best use of these links is within the context of your video. If you are doing a video on the top five sports cameras, have affiliate links to each of the cameras on Amazon in your description. The people watching that video are far more likely to be in the market for a new sports camera than viewers on other videos, and your video might just be the thing that pushes them to pull the trigger.

By including a link to the product, you are saving them the effort of going off and searching for it themselves.

And, as affiliate programmes are almost never more expensive—if anything you can often get a better deal through affiliate links—you are not inconveniencing your viewers in any way.

As an additional note, being in context doesn’t necessarily mean the product or service relates to the subject matter of the video directly. A

s an example, a channel whose content is primarily about how to make better YouTube videos might list off the equipment they use in the description, along with affiliate links to where that gear can be bought. This is useful to that channel’s viewers since “what equipment do you use” is one of the most commonly asked questions that successful YouTubers get asked.

10 Best Tools to Grow Your YouTube Channel 3

Pick Something you Believe In

I am a huge fan of services like Rev – They help me add captions and foreign language subtitles to my youtube videos at a time fee per minute. I use them personally so I know they are good and that is why I promote them using an affiliate program. It is this personal edge that helps my audience understand that if I use it, its a god product and not just a huge list of products you could grab from Amazon in a blind blog post.

Not every channel creates videos of the top ten latest gadgets that can be easily linked to on Amazon, but that doesn’t mean those channels should miss out on the affiliate marketing train.

Firstly, remember that Amazon—and direct product sales in general—are not the only options when it comes to affiliate marketing. Many digital products and services have affiliate marketing options attached to them. Indeed, services like Clickbank specialise in finding digital products that can be marketed through affiliate linking. There are also services, such as Fiverr, as we mentioned earlier.

Ultimately, if there are no affiliate products or services that you can tie into your content directly, you could go on the hunt for a product or service that you truly believe will be beneficial for your viewers, and promote that instead. For example, for a programming channel, you could promote an ergonomic desk chair. For a yoga channel, you could promote a particular type of yoga mat.

It’s a little like being sponsored by that product, only the people behind the product are not involved. And on that note, you should be careful not imply that you are sponsored, as that can cause problems with the company behind the product or service.

The important thing here is that the product or service you are promoting has some usefulness to your audience, even if it doesn’t directly relate to the content of your video. Again, you might find some people in the audience of a fishing channel who are interested in a mechanical keyboard, but it would be blind luck, and that’s no way to run a business.

Do YouTubers Pay Tax? 1

Don’t go Overboard

Regardless of the exact method of incorporating affiliate links into your content you choose, it is a universal truth across all mediums that overdoing it will have negative results.

This can be because your affiliate content is overwhelming your actual content, or simply because your audience feels it’s a bit crass.

But, whatever the reason, if you stack your description full of affiliate links and hand out promo codes every two minutes in your video, you’ll almost certainly turn large portions of your audience off.

And affiliate programmes only work when you have an audience to click those links.

Will Affiliate Links Harm my Video?

To answer this question, we first need to understand a few things about the way YouTube works.

Firstly, affiliate links are very much allowed by YouTube, which is one of the main concerns YouTubers tend to have when first venturing into the world of affiliate marketing.

However, merely being allowed to do something does not mean it can’t have negative effects on your channel.

As we touched on above, YouTube is very concerned with viewer retention. Now, we’re not saying they have no interest in bringing new eyeballs to the platform, but they are more concerned with keeping those eyeballs on YouTube once they are there. This is why average watch time is one of the most crucial metrics of a video’s success in the eyes of YouTube because more watch time means that people are spending longer on the site because of that video.

With that in mind, there is no direct association that YouTube will admit to between external links—affiliate or not—and the YouTube algorithm deciding to recommend a video less often. But there may be an indirect association.

YouTube wants people to stay on the site as long as possible. The longer a viewer is on YouTube, the more chance there is to serve them ads, and the more money YouTube can make. But if a lot of users are coming to your video and then leaving the platform altogether and not coming back, that will reflect negatively in the eyes of the algorithm.

It’s something of a catch 22—you need plenty of viewers for your affiliate links to be useful, but if your affiliate links are too effective, YouTube might see that as users coming to your video and then leaving YouTube, which may lead them to recommend your video less, which means fewer viewers to click your affiliate links. Unfortunately, there is no way around this problem, and YouTube is typically quiet about the exact way that they handle things like this.

That being said, affiliate marketing is a game of percentages—you bank on a large enough percentage of your viewers clicking your affiliate links to make it worthwhile while accepting that the overwhelming majority of them won’t.

Many YouTubers have had a great deal of success through affiliate marketing on YouTube, so there’s no reason that you can’t, too. Just remember not to overdo it, and keep the subject of your affiliates in line with the content of your videos.

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YouTube Tips for Teachers

YouTube has proved to be an invaluable resource for people who are looking to learn new skills, as well as people who want to impart their wisdom to the world.

This typically takes the form of life hacks and DIY videos, but YouTube is just as useful for educational purposes as it is for people who just want to know how to bake a cake and don’t want to take cooking classes or spend a fortune on recipe books.

Whether it’s through using YouTube videos as part of a lesson plan or making YouTube videos to help your students, YouTube can be an invaluable resource for teachers; you just need to know how to use it.

So, in an effort to do our bit for education, here’s our top YouTube tips for teachers!

There are two main ways in which a teacher can use YouTube to assist in their teaching, as we briefly mentioned above.

They are using existing videos to show your students or creating videos to show your students, and some of our tips are specific to one method or the other. To that end, we’ve broken the next section of this post into two parts;

YouTube Tips for Teachers

Tips for Teachers Using YouTube in the Classroom

One of the good things about a platform as large as YouTube is there is already an enormous amount of content out there in just about any topic you can think of, which has obvious advantages if you are looking for learning aids to help your students.

Let’s get into some YouTube tips for teachers looking to use the platform’s existing content in the classroom.

At the end of this section, we’ll list off some of our favourite educational channels that you might be able to make use of in your classroom.

Vet Your Choices

We’re sure that, as you are a qualified teacher, this doesn’t need saying. But in the interests of covering all of our bases, we’re going to say it anyway.

Always vet videos that you intend to use in class.

Though it doesn’t necessarily make them wrong, many of the content you will find on YouTube is made by people who do not necessarily have any formal qualifications in the thing they are creating videos on.

Again, it doesn’t automatically make them wrong or unsuitable, but you should give any video you plan to use in a class some thorough scrutiny before adding it to your lesson plans.

This is especially true for younger children, as you will also be vetting the video for inappropriate language and themes. Seeing as you will be showing the video in class, the video doesn’t necessarily have to be perfect.

You can always interject to correct or clarify on particular points, but if the video is quite a way off the mark, outdated, or just inappropriate for a classroom, you don’t want to be the teacher that accidentally plays because they weren’t paying attention.

YouTube Tips for Teachers 1

Look for Entertainment

Finding a video that teaches the right methods is only part of the battle. If you are going to go to the trouble of pulling up YouTube content in class, it should be entertaining for your students.

After all, you could stand at the front of the class and recite text directly from a book if the only goal was to convey information.

The goal is undoubtedly to engage the students so that they take an interest in the topic, and have a much better chance of retaining the information. Look for educational channels with large subscriber counts, as that is usually an indication that they are entertaining.

You can then check out their videos to ensure they suitable from a content standpoint.

YouTube Tips for Teachers 3

Go Bitesize

Some very informative and detailed educational videos on YouTube can run into hours in length. As a general rule, we would advise not using these videos.

It is not that they are not good, it is just that your students can watch hours of YouTube at home, they shouldn’t be doing it at school as well.

If you stick to videos that are 3-10 minutes long or use longer videos but break them into smaller chunks, you can incorporate them into your lesson, rather than have them be your lesson.

This also gives you more opportunity to make your mark as a teacher. Many people can recall at least one teacher that made a significant positive impact on them as a child.

You don’t want your chance to be that teacher for someone taken away by YouTube.

Pay Attention to Feedback

You will no doubt want to check that your students have understood what they watched, and helping them wrap their brains around anything they were unsure about is a natural part of teaching.

Beyond that, you should be on the lookout for signs that a particular YouTuber is not meshing well with your class.

If a few students struggle with a particular concept, it is probably just those students and that concept.

If, on the other hand, a lot of students regularly struggle to understand things in a certain YouTuber’s video, it may be that the YouTuber’s method just doesn’t work for your students.

Educational YouTubers: Our Picks

As promised, we’ve put together a list of educational YouTubers in a variety of topics that you might find useful for your classroom. We don’t expect you to agree with every suggestion we make, of course, but if you don’t like a particular YouTuber we suggest, be sure to pay attention to the recommended videos sidebar.

There should at least be some recommendations of a similar nature by other YouTubers for you to try.

  • Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell – Ideal for younger students, Kurzgesagt covers a variety of topics within science in videos that rarely run longer than 10 minutes, and are beautifully animated with a distinctive art style.
  • Veritasium – Run by Derek Muller—a man with a PhD in physics and a healthy curiosity about, well, everything—Vertitasium covers a huge range of topics across many areas, from videos on where the Sun gets its energy, to videos on the most radioactive places on Earth. There is even a helpful playlist for people who are new to the channel.
  • Tibees – Toby has an undergraduate degree in physics and maths and makes videos on physics, maths, and astronomy. Her content often has a quirky spin on it, such as explaining complicated mathematical premises in the style of the famous painter, Bob Ross. She has also been known to make videos breaking down past exam papers.
  • English With Lucy – The name of the channel tells you all you need to know. Lucy is a teacher herself and makes videos on a range of things to do with the English language, such as comparing British, American, and Australian English, or how to use certain words correctly.

YouTube Tips for Teachers 4

Tips for Teachers Making a YouTube Channel

One of the beautiful things about YouTube is that it is open to almost anyone, and there is nothing to stop you making your own content if you can’t find what you need on the platform already.

Or if you just feel like you could do it better than what is already available.

If this notion appeals to you, keep reading for some more YouTube tips for teachers who want to make videos.

Public or Private?

Before you start making videos for your students, you should take a moment to decide exactly who these videos are for.

If you are specifically making videos for your class, and you don’t necessarily want people outside of your class seeing them, you should upload them as unlisted, and share the link to the video with your students. Of course, there would be nothing to stop your students sharing the link, but that is, unfortunately, one of the limitations of YouTube.

Another reason to make this decision before you start filming is that it could make quite a difference in how you put your videos together.

If you are making videos for just your students, that is a relatively small audience and one that you can get immediate feedback from.

If, on the other hand, you are making your videos for wider public consumption, you will need to put serious thought into how your videos are put together. It is not enough to merely be accessible to everyone in the world; there has to be a reason to choose your video over one of the alternatives. Try to make your videos entertaining and, above all, clearly explain the subject matter.

Avoid “Cringe”

A trap many people fall into on YouTube is doing things they are not comfortable with for the views. This can happen in many ways, but as a teacher, you should avoid letting this happen to you.

Children today are constantly connected to the Internet and, as a result, each other.

There are many benefits to this, but it also means they are very aware of things and, to be frank, quite blunt about what they see.

If you make a YouTube video where you are trying to be “hip” and “cool” while teaching maths, your students are as likely to make your life miserable over it as they are to learn from it.

Be Careful About Involving Your Students

Involving your students can be a great way to get your class engaged in the process and help them absorb the subject matter more readily.

However, parents can be very twitchy about their children being filmed and posted on the Internet, even if the video is unlisted.

We’re not saying don’t do it, but you should certainly seek the permission of your student’s parents or legal guardians before putting them in a video.

Have Local Backups on Hand

Making videos isn’t easy, and if you go to the trouble of making a YouTube video for your students, you’re going to want to use it. Many schools don’t allow YouTube through their firewall, and even in today’s connected world, Internet dropouts can happen.

If you plan to play your videos in class, have them with you on a local device, such as a memory stick so that you can play them regardless of what the situation with the Internet and YouTube is at your school.

Film Entire Lessons

If you are a particularly entertaining teacher, it might be worth filming your lessons in their entirety.

This would also serve as an excellent way to help students to catch up when they have missed school for whatever reason. Rather than giving them notes, you can send them the entire lesson as it happened.

Granted, you would have to be a very entertaining teacher—or teaching an incredibly interesting topic—for this kind of video to have a broader appeal beyond your immediate students. Also, given the number of school days in a year and the number of lessons in a day, it would very quickly run into a lot of videos, so you might have to consider only keeping the latest lessons.

However, this kind of video would also be the easiest to make, as there would be no need for editing. You could simply press record at the start, stop at the end, and upload the result.

Try to Make Your Content Evergreen

If you are not just recording your lessons in full, as suggested above, we strongly recommend making your videos evergreen.

Evergreen content is content that holds relevance long after it has been uploaded. For example, a video on a clever method to work out the multiples of nine would be evergreen, as it would be as relevant in ten years as it is today.

However, a similar video but using fleeting cultural references to help get the point across could well be outdated in a year. Or less given the half-life of some celebrities these days!

By making your content evergreen, it becomes a valuable resource for you to use to help your students for years to come, not just the students you have when you make it. And, if you choose to make your videos publicly available, the same logic applies.

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Do YouTubers Get Paid Monthly?

YouTube can be—and often is—a labour of love.

Many people harbour a dream of paying the bills with the success of their channel, but only a small proportion of those people succeed in achieving that dream.

Still, success on YouTube—particularly modest success—is a very attainable goal, which has led to YouTube being seen as a legitimate career choice by many.

With any career choice comes a lot of, frankly, boring questions of a logistical nature. If you are just starting out and have no real financial goals, or, on the other end of the spectrum, if you are an enormously successful YouTuber who makes money faster than you can spend it, you don’t need to think about things like how often you get paid from your YouTubing ventures.

The reality of earning a living through YouTube is a little more grounded, however. There are far more people earning their living through YouTube who are just getting by or perhaps using YouTube to supplement other revenue sources. These people are rarely wealthy, and for them, YouTube is as much a job as any traditional employment you might care to reference.

Still, making an average salary through YouTube is often preferable to a lot of jobs out there.

Do YouTubers get paid monthly? – YouTubers who are eligible for the YouTube Partner Program will accrue income which is paid out a month in arrears. However, you must reach a total of £60 ($100) in the AdSense account to be paid for that month. YouTubers might also have external affiliate arrangements that pay on other terms.

In this post, we’re going to be looking at how often YouTubers get paid, which is a messy, sprawling topic that we can’t give a straightforward answer to since there isn’t one.

Keep reading, and we’ll go over all the ways a YouTuber typically gets paid, along with how often those payments come, and how much flexibility there is in this area. We’ll even through in a little financial advice for anyone just getting started.

How Many Views do you Need to Make Money on YouTube?

How Do YouTubers Get Paid?

To properly understand the messy and complex nature of YouTuber payment schedules, it helps to first understand how they get paid. It is not, as many people seem to think, a single revenue source coming directly from YouTube.

YouTube does offer a monetisation system for which they pay you directly, but the money earned through this method is not typically enough to quit the day job over. In fact, you would have to be getting tens of thousands of views a day to make anywhere near a decent living from this method alone.

That being said, there is more than one way to convert the success of a YouTube channel into earnings… which is also why the topic of how often YouTubers get paid is messy and complicated. Here are some of the most common ways YouTubers earn money;

  • YouTube Partner Programme
  • Memberships
  • Direct Donations
  • Brand Deals and Sponsorships
  • Merchandise Sales

YouTube has created opportunities to leverage memberships and merchandise directly through the platform for channels that meet certain criteria—10,000 subs for merch, 30,000 subs for memberships—but the main way that YouTube pays you is through their Partner Programme.

Outside of YouTube, sites like Patreon can provide you with a way to offer membership style functionality to your viewers, while there are more merchandise platforms than you can shake a branded stick at!

And, speaking of branding, brand deals and sponsorships are possibly the most lucrative option but are only a feasible option for channels with a significant audience.

How Often Do YouTubers Get Paid

Now that you have seen just a sample of the many different ways a YouTuber can get paid, you should be able to appreciate how difficult this question is to answer.

Fortunately, we do have a common theme among the most popular earning methods, so let’s take a look at that theme;

Google’s Adsense—the vehicle through which YouTube pays you—and Patreon, both utilise a monthly payout system whereby you can choose to be automatically paid every month.

There is a caveat, however. Both platforms have a minimum threshold you must reach before you can be paid. This amount comes to $100 in the United States, and a rough equivalent in other countries. If you work on the average CPM of a YouTube video, that means you would need to hit 50,000 views a month to reach the AdSense payment threshold every month.

Patreon is a different animal. The threshold for getting a payout there is a much more modest $10, and your earnings are not directly tied to your views or audience size. In both cases, you can opt to hold your payments until a later date. In the case of Patreon, this allows you to set payouts to manual and take care of the exact payout times yourself.

AdSense is less flexible, their system allows you to hold your payments for up to a year, but you are stuck with their monthly payouts and payment thresholds if you want to get your money out of your Patreon account and into your bank account.

It is worth noting that many merchandise companies work on a similar system to Patreon—where you have to reach a certain payment threshold, but you can withdraw your money anytime once you have reached that threshold.

Do YouTubers Still Get Paid for Old Videos? 1

Payment Processors

Things are a little different for money that finds its way into your payment processor.

This could happen because you are accepting direct donations from your subscribers, but more likely it will be because you have opted to have your membership or merchandise platforms pay into a payment processer (like PayPal) rather than send you a physical cheque.

With payment processors, there are usually no restrictions on when you can withdraw your money and how small an amount you can withdraw, but there may be charges associated with withdrawing your money.

This is especially the case if you reside in a different country to the company who sent the money. For example, at the time of writing, Patreon can payout in USD ($), GBP (£), and Euro (€).

If you live in a country—or, more accurately, your bank resides in a country—that does not use one of these currencies, there will likely be a conversion fee from your payment processor in order to get that money into your bank account.

Do YouTubers Get Paid Monthly?

Financial Advice

If you are asking questions like do YouTubers get paid monthly, you are probably looking at YouTube as a potential career move or at least one piece of your financial puzzle.

After all, there is no law that says you have to make your entire income from YouTube or not at all.

But if you are looking at YouTube as a potentially serious income source, it’s important to plan carefully and be smart.

We could fill an entire post with an in-depth look at this topic, but for now, here’s a quick rundown of the key points.

Build Up a Buffer

YouTube is not the most reliable source of income, particularly if the bulk or entirety of your YouTube revenue is coming directly from the YouTube Partner Programme.

If you choose to make YouTube a significant part of your financial situation, be prepared for the lows that come with those highs.

Never let yourself be in a situation where you are relying on a particular amount from YouTube to pay the bills or meet any other financial obligations you have. YouTube is notoriously unreliable when it comes to making a consistent income, and if you are living paycheck-to-paycheck with YouTube revenue, you could find yourself in serious trouble the next time an adpocalypse hits, or during a month when revenue drops for reasons beyond your control, such as seasonal behaviour.

You can’t necessarily avoid these things, but if you have a reserve of cash, you are at least protected from the immediate damage they can cause.

At the very least, you should have a few months worth of money stored up in the event your earnings dry up, though conventional wisdom states this figure should be closer to six months, if not a year.

Having this cash gives you a bit of breathing room should something happen to severely impact your earnings, and will allow you to figure things out without the axe of defaulted bills hanging over your head.

Diversify Your Income – How To Make More Money on YouTube

Another way to protect yourself against the unreliable nature of YouTube revenue is to not have all of your eggs in one basket.

If the entirety of your income is coming from the YouTube Partner Programme, you are completely at the mercy of the next significant changes YouTube make to their platform, and YouTube rarely make changes that boost everyone’s earning potential.

Making use of things like membership platforms, direct donations, merchandise sales, and any other ways of bringing the money in will protect you against your income being wiped out by one company making changes to their policy.

If at all possible, try to diversify further so that your income sources are not directly tied to your YouTube channel. For example, a Patreon page for your YouTube channel is a good way to diversify your income, but it is still built upon your channel. If your channel were to be taken down for some reason, your Patreon earnings would soon follow.

If, on the other hand, you had a blog running alongside your YouTube channel, earning revenue in its own right, you are further protected from the adverse effects of YouTube changes. Other examples include selling online teaching courses or running sponsored podcasts.

The critical factor being that, even though they may be linked to your YouTube channel by content or branding, these other ventures would be able to exist on their own, should anything happen to your channel.

Do YouTubers Get Paid Monthly? 1

Plan Plan Plan

We can’t understate the importance of proper planning when you first start out. The first year or being financially independent with YouTube as one of—or the main—income sources is especially critical.

We would recommend setting up a spreadsheet and putting in everything you have going out on a monthly basis.

We mean everything.

Make sure the entirety of your financial obligations are covered so that you can clearly see whether you are making enough money.

Hopefully, you will have taken our advice about having a buffer in place, so you’ll have a bit of a safety net to right the ship if you are not pulling in enough money, but you don’t want to get three months into your new career and find you’ve been losing money and didn’t know about it.

One particularly important aspect of this process is to account for everything. It sounds over the top, but it works. If you spend a dollar buying candy, make a note of it. If you buy a video game on sale for only a few bucks, make a note of it.

Small purchases can be the undoing of a move to become financially independent—they add up in the background while we mentally dismiss them as insignificant.

Don’t Rush Into It

The final piece of advice we’re going to impart here is to take your time with the decision to “go pro”.

Too many YouTubers rush to quit their day jobs when they have a good month or two, only to find those month’s earnings were a bit of an exceptional spike, and then they struggle to pay rent the following months.

When you first hit that magical moment where you are making enough money from your online activities to pay all the bills, wait. At least give it a few months.

Put the excess money you are earning into the backup buffer fund we mentioned above. Once you’re sure that level of income is sustainable, pull that trigger!

Do YouTubers Pay Tax? 3

Summing Up

Do YouTubers get paid monthly? Yes. Sometimes… if they want.

The exact frequency of payments to YouTubers depends entirely on whether they are successful enough to meet the criteria for joining the YouTube Partner Programme or making money through other avenues that also require a good deal of success.

It also depends on whether that YouTuber is consistently making enough money to meet the various payment thresholds many companies have in place.

That being said, “monthly” is as close as we can get to a typical payment schedule for your average YouTuber.

Most companies work on a monthly basis and, while some YouTubers may get paid far less frequently, very few—if any—YouTubers will be getting paid more frequently on a consistent basis.

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HOW TO MAKE MONEY ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

How Many Views do you Need to Make Money on YouTube?

The numbers surrounding making money on YouTube are not always particularly transparent to those on the outside.

Indeed, even the methods of making that money can sometimes be a little opaque to the uninitiated. If you are one such person, fear not; we’re going to run the whole gamut in this post, from how many views do you need to make money on YouTube to how you can go about making that money.

But for those of you who are a little impatientthe short answer is – assuming your content is advertiser friendly, you need around 30,000 views per day to make money on YouTube. This could make you around $60-90 per day based on a fairly average $2-3 RPM. This can change with seasonal ad prices with winter being more profitable compared to New Year and early spring.

But before you run off to start making videos, you should be aware that there are caveats to that number. For one thing, there is no set-in-stone amount that you earn per view. Some people will be able to make a killing on 30,000 views a day, whereas others might get twice as many views but struggle to get by on their YouTube money alone.

It is also worth knowing how we reached this number. After all, it is possible to make money with far fewer views than 30,000, but, generally speaking, fewer views means less money, so what metric are we working from?

Keep reading, and all will be revealed.

Do YouTubers Pay Tax? 3

How Much Money is Enough?

In order to make a judgement on how many views it takes to make money on YouTube, we first have to establish our standard for making money.

Technically speaking, if you earn a single cent from your YouTube channel, you are making money.

Granted one cent a month is not exactly cause for celebration, but it is technically money. On the other side of the spectrum, PewDiePie—by far the most popular individual YouTuber in the platform’s history—potentially makes as much as half a million dollars a month from YouTube ads alone! Most people can agree that, while they might like to be making that kind of money, they don’t need that much money.

We should clarify that we don’t know how much money PewDiePie makes, but based on the average YouTube CPM and PewDiePies average monthly views, we can make an educated guess. It’s also worth remembering that we’re just talking about YouTube earnings here—PewDiePie may have sponsorships and brand deals that further increase his earnings.

So, with all that in mind, what numbers are we looking at? Well, we’ll be honest, we’ve picked a relatively arbitrary figure that should represent an amount of money somewhere between the United States’ poverty line and the average salary earned by Americans. We’ve gone with this because we feel confident that no one wants to be on or below the poverty line if they can help it, but you might be prepared to earn a below-average income if it means you get to live the YouTube dream. So what are those numbers?

Do YouTubers Pay Tax? 2

How we Calculate Our Numbers

According to the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), a person in the United States is considered to be in poverty if they are earning less than $12,760 a year.

Meanwhile, the average annual salary for an American is a little over thirty thousand dollars a year. As mentioned above, we have picked a spot roughly in the middle of these figures on the basis that most aspiring YouTubers would be happy to earn a little less than average to chase their YouTube dream, but not perhaps so much less that they are officially in poverty. But how do YouTube views translate to these amounts of money?

And, just to be clear, we are only talking about YouTube Partner Programme money here—money earned directly through ads being served on your videos by Google.

The metric used for measuring the views to earnings ratio is CPM or cost per mille. CPM is a measure of how much you earn per one thousand views, and is used all over the Internet for a variety of audience-related statistics. The actual CPM your channel has will be entirely determined by the type of content you make, how engaged your audience is, how advertiser-friendly your content is, and so on. That being said, the average CPM on YouTube is around $2. That means that, on average, a YouTuber earns two dollars for every thousand views they get.

Using our 30,000 views a day average figure, you would theoretically make somewhere in the region of $22,000, which is almost right in the middle of our poverty and average salaries.

Do You Need A YouTube Intro and Outro? 2

Why It’s Not That Simple

Unfortunately, YouTube CPMs are not nearly that simple. As we stated earlier, some YouTubers will be able to make enough money from far fewer views, while others will struggle with more views.

A great deal of factors come into play when talking about how much your views are worth. Firstly, you have to be part of the YouTube Partner Programme, which has certain eligibility requirements (more on that shortly).

Secondly, your individual videos have to be eligible for monetisation—if you get 50,000 views in one day, but 40,000 of them are on videos that are not eligible to be monetised, you are can only count 10,000 views towards your CPM.

The next factor is the kind of content you are making. CPM is not a static, universal figure that applies to every YouTuber—the actual number is determined by the ads that are shown on those videos, and the ads are targeted based on the audience.

Though it doesn’t necessarily translate directly to YouTube, it can help to think of a salesperson who earns a commission. If a salesperson going door to door selling small items that cost tens of dollars will make a very small amount of money per sale. On the other hand, a salesperson in a flashy showroom selling luxury cars will make a considerable sum of money per sale.

Granted, in this scenario, the door to door salesperson will probably make a lot more sales than the car salesperson, but on YouTube, we are comparing an equal number of views.

So, if you are getting an average of 20,000 views in a niche with a high going rate for ads, you stand to earn a much higher CPM than someone in a niche with low ad rates.

Another factor is the engagement of your audience. As a general rule, pop culture videos tend to have poor CPM because their audience is much more diverse in terms of their interests. They will have come to the video to be entertained and, as a result, are not necessarily interested in any particular product or service that might be advertised at them, even when Google is serving ads targetted to that person specifically. On the other hand, a channel that is specifically about reviewing computer hardware will have an audience that is likely interested in buying computer hardware—hence why they are watching review videos. That audience will be far more likely to view a full ad or click through.

This is the main reason why a channel with a smaller audience can earn more than a larger channel. To go back to our salesperson analogy, the door-to-door salesperson has no idea if the person answering the door is going to be interested in their products, whereas the car salesman can be relatively confident that anyone walking into their showroom is at least partially interested in purchasing a car.

Another critical factor to how high your CPM can be is the length of your videos and your average watch time. Longer videos represent an opportunity for YouTube to show more advertisements, which means the potential for more money.

You can increase your CPM and improve your channel income but you might need to change your content or mindset – for more information on how to boost your channel CPM check out my deep dive blog in how to increase youtube CPM.

That being said, if your viewers regularly only watch the opening few minutes of your videos and then click away, the rest of the video—and the ads that could have been served—are not doing you any good. Though you should always prioritise the quality of your content before that video’s earning potential, it is generally recommended that a video should be at least ten minutes long, as this is the minimum length of time for YouTube to make use of mid-roll ads.

Can YouTubers Control Which Ads Are Shown? 6

YouTube’s Partner Programme

To make money directly through YouTube, you need to become part of the YouTube Partner Programme, and in order to become part of the YouTube Partner Programme, your channel has to meet certain requirements. Those requirements include;

  • Living in a region where the YouTube Partner Programme is available
  • Having more than 4,000 watch-hours over the previous twelve months
  • Having at least 1,000 subscribers
  • Having a linked AdSense account

Now, granted, none of these requirements guarantees that you are getting a particular amount of views by the time you qualify for the partner programme, but it would be difficult to reach a point where you are getting 4,000 watch hours a year and have 1,000 subscribers without at least amassing a few hundred—if not thousand—views a day on average.

The truth is, even with these requirements in place, most YouTubers who join the partner programme as soon as they are eligible barely make any money in the beginning. Given that AdSense has a $100 minimum payout threshold, it can easily be many months from you first joining the partner programme before you see any money in your bank account.

Other Methods of Earning

So far, we have been focussing exclusively on the YouTube Partner Programme as a means of earning money from your videos. In reality, the partner programme is not the best way to translate YouTube success into revenue, as CPMs are often too low, and the necessary viewing targets too difficult to achieve to make it a viable source of income. It is also the unfortunate reality of YouTube that, for some YouTubers, the number of views they would need to turn their CPM into a viable income is forever out of their reach. This is not because of any failing on their part, but a natural limitation of the niche they are creating videos in.

The more focussed your niche is, the more value each viewer represents, but the fewer viewers there are. Going back to our salesperson example, the door-to-door salesperson might not know if they are knocking on the door of an interested customer, but they have lots of doors to knock on.

In contrast, the luxury car salesperson knows that people walking in are interested in buying a car, but won’t get many customers walking through the door.

If you assume that you need at least 30,000 views a day and you are creating videos for a niche where there are perhaps a million interested viewers, that means that each of your videos has the potential for a little over thirty days viewing before everyone who is interested has seen it. And, truthfully, you’re unlikely to get a view from everyone who is interested in that niche, regardless of how popular you are.

This is where other methods of earning money from your YouTube success come in, methods like membership platforms, merchandise, and brand deals. With membership platforms—such as Patreon, or YouTube’s in-house solution—your viewers can chip in a small monthly sum to support your content, providing you with additional earnings and a more reliable source of income. Brand deals and sponsorships are less predictable since they can range from a single video for a few hundred dollars all the way up to a multi-video sponsorship for thousands of dollars.

The important part about these alternative methods of earning money is that they are not inherently linked to your number of views. Granted, more views means a bigger audience, and a bigger audience means it is more likely that you will be able to attract members to your membership platform, or brands to offer you a deal.

But viewing figures are not the hard barrier that they are for the YouTube Partner Programme and your earnings through that programme. You are not required to have a certain amount of views before you can sign up for Patreon, nor will a brand refuse to sponsor a video if the view count isn’t high enough when there are other factors at play. Marketing is evolving all the time, and brands are increasingly about quality over quantity.

You could, in theory, convince a brand to sponsor your content before you’ve even uploaded your first video.

You probably won’t succeed… but you could.

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DEEP DIVE ARTICLE HOW TO GET MORE VIEWS ON YOUTUBE TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

YouTube Shorts Explained [What, Where, How, When & Why?]

YouTube shorts is the first new and large feature to be added to the YouTube app and platform for years.

This could be the start of a land grab for attention that we all need to pay attention to as Youtube positions itself to take on the vertical video format platforms like TikTok, SnapChat and Instagram Reels.

Quickly, what are YouTube Shorts? – YouTube Shorts are vertical format videos like TikTok. 0-60 seconds in length, uploaded using the YouTube Shorts App or uploaded as a normal video and tagged with #shorts in the title or description. These can be displayed on the stories shelf under suggested videos on mobile devices.

This could be the next big land grab in the YouTube platforms history so in this article I am going to step you through all I know about the new feature

What Are YouTube Shorts?

TikTok has rocked the digital world by grabbing the attention of the younger generation who want to share their videos and express themselves – and where the youth goes, so does the potential future of digital media.

We have seen this play out time and time again when a platform ages up too much that something new and “cool” comes along for the younger generation to play with.

MySpace was killed by the new Facebook.

Facebook got too widely used with even your grandma having a profile so people started to take selfies on Instagram and Snapchat.

Instagram got swamped with professionals and people worried that it was “too late to start a  YouTube Channel?” and so TikTok was the new home of the younger up coming demographic of content creators.

YouTube saw this trend and understood that if they want to stay on top of the video creation wave, they will need to win over the next generation of video makers back from TikTok – enter YouTube Shorts!

How To Make YouTube Shorts

Initially the YouTube Shorts tool is a closed beta in India to capitalize on India’s ban on TikTok leaving a very large gap in the market for YouTube to convert into new users.

How do I make a YouTube short? – You can make a YouTube short in the YouTube Mobile App by clicking the + icon at the bottom of the screen and choosing “create a short”. If you can’t see this feature you can upload vertical video under 60 seconds in length and tag it with #shorts in the title or description.

When using the feature via mobile tool (as of Oct 2020) it has very limited tools to assist with content creation but you can speed up your footage and set a timer for hands free recording.

While uploading the video as a normal video might give you a little more flexibility to record a vertical video and then edit it just like a normal video with overlays, music, transitions etc

  • Create: Creation is at the core of short-form video, and we want to make it easy and fun to create Shorts. We’re starting to test just a few new tools for creators and artists with our early beta in India:
    • multi-segment camera to string multiple video clips together,
    • The option to record with music from a large library of songs that will continue to grow,
    • Speed controls that give you the flexibility to be creative in your performance,
    • And a timer and countdown to easily record, hands-free.

Why make YouTube Shorts?

You have been on the YouTube platform for years and you have always been told to stick to horizontal rather than “ugly looking vertical£ videos – why start making vertical videos now?

YouTube wants to win the new young creator demographic away from TikTok and to do that they are pushing the feature very hard to viewers.

Your videos could show up under the first suggested video on the mobile app giving you a large boost of views. Adopt it early and you could see great results before EVERYONE uses it! Make eye catching relevant videos and you could get featured against established large youtube channels.

Imagine if you could be one of the first people on YouTube all those years ago. Or one of the first people to grow an audience on Twitter and Instagram… this is your chance at a fresh new medium, but this time its supercharged by YouTube!

Even YouTube is exited about the tool

Get discovered: Every month, 2 billion viewers come to YouTube to laugh, learn and connect. Creators have built entire businesses on YouTube, and we want to enable the next generation of mobile creators to also grow a community on YouTube with Shorts.

I have been testing YouTube shorts and seen huge jumps in views even when the channel has only 65 subscribers!

YouTube Shorts Explained [What, Where, How, When & Why?]

Where Can I See YouTube Shorts?

YouTube shorts are currently curated by YouTube and displayed under videos on the mobile app.

It has its own shelf that you can swap through and the youtube shorts normally match the topic of the main video above – for example if you are watching a tech tips video you might see tech related short stories.

YouTube Shorts Explained [What, Where, How, When & Why?] 1

What is YouTube Shorts sizes? ratio?

The standard aspect ratio for YouTube Shorts 9:16. YouTube may add more padding for optimal viewing. The padding is white by default, and dark gray when Dark theme is turned on.

Recommended resolution & aspect ratios for YouTube Shorts.

For 9:16 youtube shorts aspect ratio, encode at these resolutions:

2160p: 2160×3840
1440p: 1440×2560
1080p: 1080×1920
720p: 720×1280
480p: 480×854
360p: 360×640
240p: 240×426

Can I monetize YouTube Shorts? YouTube Shorts Monetization

As with all video platforms people want to know if they can monetize it – because what’s the point of a large audience if you can’t make some pocket money from it.

Can you monetize YouTube Shorts? – Initially YouTube Shorts are not being monetized by YouTube and they do not count towards the YouTube Partner Program watch time hours you need to qualify to monetize your channel. However, TikTok currently offers a monetization program for their videos so YouTube will follow suit in future.

YouTube Shorts FAQs

Does YouTube Shorts watch time count towards monetization?

I the YouTube Short is viewed as a short from a YouTube Shorts shelf under a view then the watch time does not count towards monetization totals. However, if the short is watched on the YouTube channel as a native standard video then it does count towards channel totals.

Do I Have To Pay To Make YouTube Shorts?

No, YouTube Shorts are free to anyone. You can make them using the mobile app by clicking the “+” icon at the bottom of the screen and clicking “Make A Short”. Alternatively, you and upload the vertical video that is under 60 seconds as a standard video and tag it with #shorts in the title or description.

 

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SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE YOUTUBE TUTORIALS

How To Bold YouTube Comments (Plus Strikethrough and Italics). Bonus Tip: Add Emojis Too.

Sometimes plain old boring text just doesn’t cut it when you want to leave a comment on YouTube. Maybe you want to get noticed by your favourite influencer, or perhaps you want a comment to be understood by readers on a deeper level.

Whatever the reason, YouTube permits some text formatting when you leave a comment under a video. There are three effects to choose from to dress up your text; bold, italic and strikethrough.

Unlike word processors and email clients, there are no text formatting icons available with YouTube to change the style; instead, you have to type in other special characters either side of the text you want to style.

So let’s jump in and take a look at how you can format your text in a YouTube comment.

How To Add Bold Text To a YouTube Comment

Bolding words is a centuries-old technique of dressing up the visual appearance of text. Bolding strengthens the emphasis of a particular word or phrase, and you might do this because you want to highlight the importance of a point.

For example, ‘I can’t believe she did that’ sounds different in your head when you read it as ‘I can’t believe she did that’.

In the olden days, scribes used a quill and ink to hand-thicken writing to emphasise a word. Later on, printers used a different font style to emphasise words. Then, in 1845, an enhanced ‘Clarendon’ font typeface was designed, that contained an extra set of type in the same style, but bolder.

To change your text style, so it displays in bold in a YouTube comment, you need to add an asterisk (*) either side of the word or phrase. It’s important to note that you shouldn’t add in and additional spaces.

Meaning each asterisk (or star) should be next to the first and last letter of the text you want to display as bold. If you are struggling to find the asterisk (*) it’s located on most English layout keyboards as the alternative character to the number 8.

Hold down the shift key and press 8 to test it yourself.

Here is an example of bolding text. Copy and paste the following string of text into a YouTube comment yourself and hit the ‘Comment’ button to see how it looks.

Don’t mind me, I’m just figuring out how to make text *bold* !

After you’ve posted your comment, the text with the asterisks on either side is displayed in bold. The asterisks have disappeared from the posted comment, and your’s now stands out from all the drab standard text above and below it!

Note: If you want to add punctuation after a comment you have boldened, you need to add in a space after the closing asterisk. If you don’t put the space in, it will ‘break’ the instruction, and your comment will display the asterisks.

How To Italicise Text in a YouTube Comment.

Italics is a font style where the writing slopes from left to right. They were first designed in the 1500s, and Wikipedia says that using italics is ‘the print equivalent of underlining‘. Some grammatical conventions say that you should use italics when writing spoken words too, like;

Jenny bounded up the stairs and said, here I am!

Other conventions say that you should use italics when you identify something like a book or a film. One example that works for both is Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.

Whatever you choose to italicise, it’s another form of emphasis you can add to your writing. There are no hard and fast rules, though, so use it however you’d like.

To make the text display in italics, you need to follow the same process as for making text bold, but this time instead of the asterisk you should use the underscore sign (_) directly either side of the text you want to change.

The underscore is a bit of a funny character. It’s found on the same key as the minus sign, or hyphen, and is a character that a lot of people often confuse.

To get the underscore sign press the dash/minus character button while holding down the shift key. The underscore is most often found to the right of the 0 (zero) in the horizontal row of number keys.

Here is an example of italicising the text. Copy and paste the following text string exactly as it is into a YouTube comment section.

Now I’m typing in _italics_ , there really is no stopping me!

Once again, after you have clicked on the comment button, stand back and admire your newfound power. But don’t let it go to your head just yet – there is more to learn.

How To Add a Strikethrough Effect To Your YouTube Comments.

Sometimes instead of deleting something you have written, you might want to strike it out instead, to show the reader that you have changed your mind but let them still read what you previously thought.

Interestingly, the writers of the Domesday Book did strikethrough some entries with red ink. But in this situation, they were doing a medieval version of underlining rather than striking through a written word so they could use another. Conventions change over time.

Today, strikethrough is generally used in two ways. Firstly, in the usual manner, for example, The meeting will be held at Newcastle-Under-Lyme Newcastle-Upon-Tyne. Many people, though, use it for humour. Like, ‘today I have been watching Netflix in my onesie working my butt off on an essay’.

To make text display with the strikethrough effect in a YouTube comment, again you need to place a special character either side of the word you want to format. The character used for strikethrough is the minus or hyphen sign (-).

Here is an example of strikethrough text. Copy and paste the following text string exactly as it is into the YouTube comment section.

Gaze upon my glory as I perform the magic of -strikethrough- !

Click the comment button to update your entry and take a look at that lovely effect.

Advanced Usage

OK, I hope you’re sitting down for this part because it’s likely to blow your mind. You can combine all three effects into the same sentence!

I know this information may be more than some readers can handle. But let’s plough on regardless.

Here’s an example:

First they told me I couldn’t *bold* , then they said _italics_ was beyond my capabilities, and they laughed and pointed saying ‘you’ll never know -strikethrough- ’. Well *whose* _laughing_ -now- !

Use Your Powers Wisely

In all seriousness, don’t overuse text formatting in your YouTube comments. Sometimes when you learn how to do something new, you can go a little overboard and get carried away.

Additionally, formatting the whole of a long comment in bold or italic means that you will stand out, but for all the wrong reasons. Instead of drawing in attention to your comment, people will assume you are a little crazy, and ignore your comment instead.

Bold, italics, and strikethrough are there to emphasise a few words and communicate what you are saying more effectively.

Bonus: How To Add Emojis To a YouTube Comment on the Desktop Version of YouTube.

Of course, it’s easy to add emojis to your YouTube comments when using your smartphone. Smartphone keyboards aren’t physical like desktop keyboards, so it’s easy to add in extra functions and characters.

But if you’ve ever wondered how to add emojis to your youtube comments using a physical keyboard with a laptop or desktop PC? Let me tell you the secret; there are three ways.

On Apple Mac, you can bring up an emoji menu using the keyboard shortcut control+command+spacebar. This gives you access to the same group of emojis you find on your iPhone, and you can click on the popup to add in an emoji wherever the cursor is flashing.

If you use Windows 10, then there is a similar emoji menu pop-up with a keyboard shortcut. Press the Windows key plus the full-stop or semi-colon key to bring up the emoji selector.

If you don’t like either of these options, or you are on an older version of Windows, then you can copy and paste emojis directly into YouTube comments.

Go to a website like Get Emoji. This site has a list of all the standard emojis, which you can copy and paste into YouTube comments and a whole host of other social media applications.

Simply highlight the emoji you want and copy it. Then, navigate back to your YouTube comment to paste the emoji in. Voila!

So there you have it. I hope you liked this little guide to enhancing text comments for YouTube. Head over to my YouTube account now, and leave me a comment using bold, italic, or strikethrough.

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DEEP DIVE ARTICLE HOW TO GET MORE VIEWS ON YOUTUBE SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

Best Time to Upload Videos To YouTube for MORE VIEWS

YouTube has been around long enough now and made enough people quite wealthy that succeeding on the platform has become something of a science.

People analyse the way the algorithm behaves to try and glean what it considers to be recommendable content. They test different thumbnails styles for better click-through-rates and experiment with alternative titles.

They even consider the placement of their “don’t forget to subscribe” pop-up down to the second. And, yes, they put a great deal of thought into when the best time to upload a video is.

The truth is, all of these things can have a surprisingly large impact on the success of any given video.

In this post, we’re taking a look at those upload times specifically. We’re going to take a deep dive into what factors are at play when you upload in the morning versus when you upload in the evening, and whether the middle of the week is better than a weekend.

Unfortunately, there is no single YouTube best time to upload that we can throw out there as a one-size-fits-all solution. But when people ask “When is the best time to upload videos to YouTube?” I tell them – An upload schedule is unique to each channel. Look at your audience location and age range then match your uploads to their live patterns. For example school kids before and after school, adults more evenings and weekends. Overtime your audience will show you what they like and when.

However, this a complex topic with a lot of moving parts, so make yourself comfortable, and let’s dive in!

YouTube Best Time to Upload 1

Why Are Upload Times Significant?

The first part of this question is simple enough—YouTube places a lot of stock in popularity. If a video is getting lots of views, YouTube is more likely to see it as something worth pushing out to recommendation feeds.

The fleeting nature of viral videos and trends leads to a “strike while the iron is hot” mentality in which YouTube will want to capitalise on the popularity of a video while it is hot so as to avoid missing the window since they don’t know if the interest will still be there in a few days.

So, it pays to get a lot of attention to your video in a short space of time, even if you are making evergreen content that will still be relevant months or years down the line. And the easiest time to get a lot of viewers at once is when you first upload.

YouTube users are typically very liberal with their subscribing finger. For most of the people reading this post, the chances are that if you look in your subscriber list, there are far more subscribers than you actively keep up with.

There’s nothing wrong with this behaviour—most of us do it—but it does mean that notifying you about new videos can be problematic. If you have a hundred channels you are subscribed to (not uncommon) and at least fifty of them upload on a weekly basis, there’s a good chance that some of those videos are going to clash.

The next problem is that we are not looking at our YouTube notifications all day every day, so we don’t always see notifications in real-time.

The problem here is that YouTube does not like bombarding users with notifications. It isn’t very pleasant, and a surefire way to push people to turn their notifications off entirely, and YouTube certainly doesn’t want that.

So, if you open up your YouTube app and there have been eight new videos from channels you are subscribed since the last time you looked, YouTube won’t always show you notifications for all of those videos. Indeed, they might only show you one!

Even getting your subscribers to “ring that bell” is not a guaranteed way of ensuring they are notified since your video could hit the same bottleneck if a subscriber has multiple videos vying for notification attention at the same time.

YouTube Best Time to Upload

TV is not a Good Model

In the early days of YouTube, as the platform started to settle into more than just short videos of people visiting the zoo, many YouTubers took a cue from broadcast television when deciding their upload schedule.

TV show schedules have been carefully honed over years of experience, and typically involve saving your best content for the evening. This is when the most people are going to be sat watching their TV.

For the younger members of our audience, it might be worth pointing out that this kind of system was worked out long before video-on-demand services like Netflix, and even before DVR capabilities. There was a time, not too distant, where shows were broadcast live and if you wanted to watch a show, you had to be in front of your TV during that live broadcast, or hope for a rerun in the future.

That may have worked for those early YouTubers, but the paradigm has well and truly shifted since the late 00s. People have come to know YouTube as a new medium that isn’t beholden to the restrictions of TV, rather than a mere extension of it.

And, with YouTube views increasingly coming from mobile devices, the watching habits of users is further skewing away from those traditional TV schedules.

Timing for Noobs

Before we get into any specific talk about when you should post your videos, it’s worth pointing out that none of this really applies to new channels.

If you are just starting out, you almost certainly don’t have an audience you are trying to please, so there is no sense in trying to work out when the best upload times for that audience are.

In the beginning, you should focus on establishing a routine that works for you. Until you have built up an audience, the important thing is consistency, rather maximising your potential.

Pick a time that works for you and try to stick to it so that the viewers you attract can get used to your schedule. As you grow as a channel, you can begin experiment more with the things we are going to go into below.

YouTube Best Time to Upload 2

Knowing Your Audience: Timezone Edition

Before you can determine when the best time to upload for your channel is, you need to establish the timezones of your core audience. Unfortunately, this will be trickier for some channels than it will be for others.

On the plus side of things, this part being trickier is usually a sign that you are doing well as a YouTuber.

If your channel has a very clear audience geographically speaking, this shouldn’t be too much of a problem.

For example, if your audience is almost entirely UK-based, you can just mark it down as GMT (or BST depending on the time of the year) and move on to working out what the best time of day to upload is.

Unfortunately, if your audience is a little more widespread, things won’t be so simple. For example, English-speaking content that is not geared towards a specific region (people in America probably don’t care about local news in the UK, for example) could theoretically appeal to the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand—countries that cover a whole gamut of timezones.

Depending on the exact part of each country we are talking, it could be the middle of the night in the US and Canada, early morning in the UK, late afternoon in Australia, and early evening in New Zealand. All at the same time.

Needless to say, working out the best time to upload in this situation is a little more complicated.

The best bet here is to try and determine if you have a primary market. For most YouTubers, it will likely be the region they live in, but if you have one region that consumes your content noticeably more than other areas, it might be worth focussing on that.

And, if you don’t have that one region you can zero in on, you can just pick the one you prefer, or go back to uploading at a time that suits you first and foremost. As we will explore shortly, the exact upload time isn’t the be-all and end-all of YouTube success.

YouTube Best Time to Upload 3

Knowing Your Audience: Age and Habits Edition

We talked a little above about how YouTube has well and truly moved away from those viewing schedules set out by broadcast television, but how does that help you establish your own upload schedule?

Before we get into this, we should clarify that none of these are hard rules—there are always exceptions. Also, we’re leaving out Generation Alpha, which consists of people born between the early 2010s and the mid-2020s.

Given that, at the time of writing, the oldest example of Gen Alpha will be around eight years old, there’s no sense talking about when the best upload times are for them, as there are a whole other set of rules to factor in when making content for children.

Zoomers

Firstly, let’s talk about the Zoomers, also known as Gen Z, which covers people born between the mid-to-late 1990s to the early 2010s. These are children and young adults who have always had the Internet—and mostly had YouTube—their whole lives.

They will usually be in some form of education (unless you’re reading this in ten years) which will put a limit on their viewing time. If your primary audience falls into this bracket, you probably want to focus on early mornings and late afternoons.

This age range is not particularly suited for late-night, as younger Zoomers will likely be in bed, and older ones will be busy being teenagers and young adults.

YouTube Best Time to Upload 4

Millennials

This generation covers people born between the early 1980s and late 1990s and is notable from a YouTube perspective as being the generation that YouTube’s success was built on.

Gen Z may be surpassing them in terms of user numbers, but it was millennials like PewDiePie, Philip DeFranco, TomSka, Jenna Marbles, iJustine, and countless others of that age group that ushered YouTube into the age of success it currently enjoys.

Millennials are mostly out in the world now, meaning they tend to have jobs, and not many jobs allow you to sit and watch YouTube while you’re working.

But, while this generation may remember a time before smartphones and broadband, they have nonetheless grown up with it, and are very comfortable using the technologies that are built around these things. In other words, you may lose your millennial audience during the mornings and afternoons, but you could still catch them on their lunch breaks thanks to the ease with which YouTube can be watched on the phone these days.

Evenings can be a bit hit and miss, however.

The millennial age range is both young enough to still be out socialising on an average night, but also old enough to have slowed down a little, and nights in more than nights out.

Generation X

Generation X, also known as the MTV Generation, the Latchkey Generation, and the Lost Generation, is a generation of people born between 1965 and 1980.

This generation had mostly hit adulthood by the time the Internet started changing the world, and so tend to be less embracing of technology than their younger counterparts.

This generation doesn’t tend to be accessible from a YouTube perspective outside of their downtime, which means you’re far less likely to catch them before early evenings.

You may get some traction in the mornings, but you are unlikely to get a significant amount of Gen X watching YouTube on their phones at lunch breaks.

Baby Boomers, Silent Generation, and Greatest Generation

Though some Baby Boomers are still young enough to be in the regular workforce, we’re lumping these generations together because they are all more or less in the same situation, which is retirement.

For older YouTube viewers, the upload times are far more flexible, Generally speaking, you want to aim for before early evening, but other than that you should be good to go.

YouTube Best Time to Upload 5

Experiment

Where possible, try experimenting with different upload times. Bear in mind that the videos will need to have a similar level of expectation for the experimenting to be effective.

There is no sense comparing a video that you expect to do really well with a video you hope will at least be average.

Ultimately, the congestion caused by multiple video uploads and the unpredictable schedules of individual users will always make the ideal upload time something of a guessing game, so experimenting may be your only surefire way to know.

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HOW TO MAKE MONEY ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

Do YouTubers Still Get Paid for Old Videos?

One of the most appealing aspects of a career as YouTuber is the potential for passive income.

Passive income is something of a holy grail for many, as it essentially represents free money. It’s not “free”, of course, but it can feel like it.

Passive income is what you get when you put time, effort, money, or any combination of those things into something, and that thing continues earning you money long after you’re done, with little-to-no effort on your part.

The most basic example of this would be a savings account—you put money into the savings account, and it accrues interest while you do nothing. The more money you put in, the more interest you earn. Now, granted, the amount of money you would need to make your living from savings account interest is probably in the millions of dollars, but the concept is the same.

Another example is being a landlord.

You put the work in to buy a property and get tenants, and then you sit back and collect rent. As these two examples should illustrate, passive income can have varying levels of involvement. Savings accounts require nothing from you after your investment, whereas tenants may require a lot.

So, how does this relate to YouTube?

Well, YouTube represents a potential passive income source thanks to the fact that your videos, once uploaded and published, remain there for the world to see for as long as you choose to leave them up.

But do YouTubers still get paid for old videos? If those videos are monetized and earning money, then they can be a passive income source. The larger the back catalogue the more videos you have for YouTube to suggest and advertise against. 

You could do some additional work, of course, but more on that later.

Youtube Community Tab: What It Is And How To Use It To Grow Your Channel. 19

YouTube Partners

This is only a small point so we won’t dwell on it, but it’s one that many people looking in on YouTube from the outside are unaware of. In order for a YouTuber to make any money through their channel directly, they need to be part of the YouTube Partner Programme – as fully explained in my deep dive blog.

This applies to any YouTuber no matter how long they have been on the platform or how successful they have been in the past.

In particular, the restriction of at least 4,000 hours watch time over the previous twelve months could cause problems for a dead channel (assuming the owner still cares about the revenue it generates), since a channel that has been inactive for long enough may drop below this threshold, and potentially removed from the partner program.

In such a case, the relevance of their old videos would not make a difference, since the videos would not be earning money, to begin with.

That being said, if a channel’s watch time has dropped to less than 4,000 hours a year, the amount of money it would likely have generated would have been insignificant.

Evergreen Content

The key to longevity in your old video’s earning power is evergreen content—this is the name given to content that has lasting relevance. An example of evergreen content might be a lifehack video that shows a very useful trick that is just as effective years later as it was the day you uploaded it.

On the other hand, an example of decidedly not evergreen content would be a video on celebrity gossip. In an age of 24-hour news cycles and constant social media exposure, such a video could be out of date before the end of the day it was uploaded!

When trying to make evergreen content, take your time to fully explore the future of your video idea. Something like a current events news video is obviously going to have a limited shelf life, but tutorials and lifehacks aren’t guaranteed longevity, either.

For example, videos on clever techniques for improving your guitar skills might never lose their relevance—the only potential enemy there would be other videos coming along and doing it better.

But a video on how to improve the performance on a particular model of phone may have a very limited shelf life depending on when that phone will next be superseded, and how quickly it will fall out of favour with the consumers.

Demonetisation

Another thing to think about when considering the lasting earning power of older videos is the changing landscape of YouTube monetisation.

In particular, the many adpocalypses that have taken place—where YouTube have changed policies that have resulted in many videos being demonetised—as well the constant trend of giving copyright holders more power to claim your content for their own over the smallest infringements, or mistaken claims.

Through this mechanism, videos that may have been happily earning a regular income for years could be instantly cut off due to some change in YouTube’s policies. In some cases, you may be able to appeal such a decision or make a minor change that will remove the infringement, but it will require action on your part.

In many cases, it would not be just one video that is demonetised, with past adpocalypses seeing some highly successful channels getting most of their back catalogue demonetised overnight.

Do YouTubers Still Get Paid for Old Videos?

What About Dead Channels?

A dead channel is a channel where the YouTuber has stopped uploading content and has given no indication that they intend to resume in the future. As we touched on above, this doesn’t necessarily mean the end of that channel’s earning potential—at least not immediately.

As long as the channel continues to meet the criteria for the YouTube Partner Programme, any eligible videos will continue to earn money.

Remember, one of the requirements for being part of the partner program is having an AdSense account, so as long that AdSense account is active, the money will keep funnelling into it. And, if a channel owner closes their AdSense account, that channel will no longer be eligible to be part of the YouTube Partner Programme.

Eventually, though, a dead channel’s views will dwindle over time. Some channels may have a lot of staying power after the YouTuber has deserted it—after all, YouTube is only fifteen years old, it hasn’t been around long enough to truly know—but there is no such thing as a video that remains relevant forever.

There will always be new information to make it less relevant, or new videos to supersede it.

Can YouTubers Control Which Ads Are Shown? 6

Algorithm Boost

On the opposite side of that losing relevance coin is the fabled algorithm boost.

It has become a matter of memedom in the comments of many YouTube videos how the YouTube recommendation algorithm can be a little… eccentric, at times.

Of course, the people in those comments generally seem to feel the algorithm made a solid recommendation as they enjoyed the video, but that doesn’t make it any less strange that someone in the middle of a binge of dozens of chiropractic back cracking videos might suddenly get a recommendation for a short video showing a cameraman outrunning the lead runner in a sprint race he is filming.

Incidentally, we know that video is taken from a commercial for a sports drink, but the point stands.

The YouTube algorithm works in weird and wonderful ways, and many YouTubers have found themselves logging into their account to find thousands, even hundreds of thousands of extra views as a result of an unexpected algorithm boost.

Some channels are even launched off of the back such a boost.

Channels that have been stagnant for some time—or have only been managing a very small amount of growth—get a sudden jolt from the YouTube algorithm and go on to be incredibly successful, with that boost as a clear turning point.

Of course, if you intend to build a passive income out of your YouTube channel, you can’t rely on an algorithm boost that, quite frankly, probably won’t come. It is much better to focus on making your channel useful and relevant and growing it naturally.

That way, if it does get a bit of a bump from YouTube, it will be a pleasant surprise.

Or you could try to revive an old video with better SEO, a new title and an eye catching thumbnail – I use VidIQ to boost my old YouTube videos and you can install it for free on their website!

What Kinds of Content Have Lasting Relevance?

It should go without saying that there is no single absolute key to success here. If there was, everybody would be doing it.

As mentioned above, a how-to video on a piece of technology that could be out of date in six months and largely out of use in a year or two is not a good candidate for an evergreen video, but how-to videos, in general, are excellent.

With that in mind, here are some of the most common types of evergreen content you might find on YouTube.

How To Make A Playlist on YouTube & Why? (with Pictures)

How-To/Tutorial Videos

Practical knowledge never goes out of style. As we’ve mentioned, the thing you are teaching may lose relevance, but you can always plan to avoid such things.

For example, I make YouTube tips and tricks videos explaining everything you need to know about YouTube. This provides useful tips that rarely age and can rank well on search engines.

Maybe you want to make tips and tricks for optimising a mobile phone operating system like Android may not be the best route, since a new version of that operating system is released on a yearly basis. On the other hand, desktop operating systems tend to have a much longer lifespan, with Windows being roughly 4-7 years.

It doesn’t have to be technology, of course.

General life hacks are also popular, as well as how-to videos for useful, practical things that people might need. And, as an added bonus, this type of video is more likely to hold relevance for a much longer time.

If you make a video about the latest game console, it will only be relevant as long as people are using that console, but a video about making jam or repairing a wooden chair will be as relevant in five years as it is today.

Is It Legal to Make YouTube Videos from Books? 4

Educational Content

Another type of video that is good for evergreen content is educational content.

The exact subject matter isn’t necessarily important; it could be a video on ancient Greece, a guide on how to do algebra or an interesting look into the formation of mountains. The good thing about educational content is that it rarely loses its relevance.

Granted, new discoveries are made by historians from time to time, and scientific discoveries happen on a fairly regular, but for the most part, unless you are making videos on the bleeding edge of quantum physics or cutting edge medical science, the chances are your content will hold its relevance for a long time.

Maths and history are particularly useful for this, since paradigm-changing discoveries in historical circles are relatively rare, and much of maths remains the same today as it has for centuries.

You could also branch out into more advanced topics, such as foreign languages, programming, and bushcraft.

Granted, some of these videos straddle a line between education and how-to videos, but it doesn’t really matter what exact category your content falls under as long as it does the job you want it to.

Is It Legal to Make YouTube Videos from Books? 2

Informational Videos

Again, we might be straddling the line of educational content with this one, but informational videos—as long as they are accurate—are also good for maintaining relevance.

An example of this might be a video on how you apply for a building permit in a particular state, or what the law is regarding street performing. It could also be a deep dive on how a particular type of building has to be constructed in order to not fall over.

The basic premise here is that you are providing useful information, so the information must be accurate if you are to catch and retain an audience, which is key to YouTube seeing your channel as an authoritative source and recommending your content in future.

That means keeping up to date with whatever topic you are sharing information about.

If the information changes, you will need to update your content, since leaving incorrect information on a channel that is supposed to be providing accurate information will harm that channel’s reputation.

Conclusions

So, do YouTubers still get paid for old videos? As long as a YouTuber has content that was earning money in the first place, and that content has lasting relevance that viewers will still be searching for long after the upload date, that YouTuber can still earn money from their older videos.

Their channel has to be eligible to earn money, and their videos have to have not fallen victim to any copyright claims or adpocalypse fallout, which can pose a problem for a lot of older content.

But for a YouTuber with a substantial back catalogue and a willingness to fix any potential infractions of YouTube policies, old videos can be an excellent way of earning a passive income from the work you have already put in.

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BUSINESS TIPS HOW TO MAKE MONEY ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

4 Books for New Entrepreneurs That All YouTubers Should Read

They teach many subjects at school, but one that I think is missing from the syllabus is entrepreneurship.

Entrepreneurship is the art of turning muck into brass, the practice of taking an idea and nurturing it until it blooms into a money-making powerhouse.

Some people say that you can’t teach entrepreneurship, because you have to have a particular personality or an elusive ‘x-factor’ to have any chance of success. I think they’re wrong.

Entrepreneurship is a skill that can be learned by anyone, and I believe everyone should try to launch a business at least once. So, if you’re a new entrepreneur, and are looking for some help and guidance from those who have tried entrepreneurship and succeeded, here is a selection of books you should consider adding to your bookshelf.

I am much more of an audiobook “reader” as I tend to take it in easier – I even use Amazon’s FREE Audible trials to load up on 2 free books every month.

Book 1: Crushing It!

Author: Gary Vaynerchuk

Number of pages: 288

Published: 2018

Why should you listen to him?: Gary Vaynerchuk is a global social media superstar.

Known affectionately as Gary Vee, Vaynerchuk was born in Belarus in 1975 but emigrated to the USA with his parents at a young age. Raised in New York City, Vaynerchuk showed entrepreneurial spirit as a boy, buying and selling baseball cards at school. He joined his parent’s wine business at 14, and after he took over in 2003, he grew it from $3 million to $60 million a year in revenue.

Vaynerchuk spotted the internet’s potential early, launching a channel on YouTube in 2006 to promote the wine business. Famous for hard work and ‘hustle’, Vaynerchuk now owns a $100 million social media digital agency, VaynerMedia, and gives inspirational speeches internationally about entrepreneurship and social influencing.

Book Synopsis: The book is part motivational and part social media strategy manual. Vaynerchuk explains how personal branding over social media is crucial to success today as an entrepreneur.

The book is in two parts. The first part gets you pumped up for the road ahead and gives you eight foundational principals on which to build your business.

The second part delves deeper into different social media platforms, covering YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and a few others. Vaynerchuk shows you how to use each platform to gain attention and grow your entrepreneurial endeavours. Each chapter is illustrated with real-life case studies from successful small businesses who have followed his framework.

Even though the book is nearly three years old, it’s often found near the top of the charts. It ranks top 10 on Amazon Audible in the categories for Social Media, Web Marketing, and E-commerce. Many people consider it one of the first books to buy when you are thinking about starting a business.

The book is available in several formats. There are the usual hardback and paperback, plus Kindle too. The best way to absorb it is via Amazon Audible, though. Narrated by Vaynerchuk and two other colleagues, you get to understand and learn the book’s lessons via Gary Vee’s unique style of delivery.

Amazon Link To Book: Buy The Book Now.

Book 2: Primalbranding: Create Zealots for Your Brand, Your Company, and Your Future: Create Belief Systems that Attract Communities.

Author: Patrick Hanlon

Number of pages: 272

Published: 2011

Why should you listen to him?: Patrick Hanlon is a world-renowned branding consultant. He has worked with the likes of Levi’s, PayPal, and Shopify to help them develop their brands and connect with new audiences.

He gives talks and lectures internationally on the topic of branding, is a contributor to the major news networks, and owns several consulting businesses which offer advice on branding in the digital age.

Book Synopsis: How do some companies like Tesla, create a horde of devoted followers while other businesses, despite access to the same level of resources, struggle or even become objects of scorn?

Hanlon argues that companies like Tesla succeed because they build a following of people who become true believers and advocates for their brand.

Primalbranding identifies the seven pieces of ‘primal code’ that humans instinctively use to form groups. He then applies this to branding and shows you how you can use these hardwired human dynamics and apply them to shape your brand and attract a legion of followers.

The book is divided into three sections. The first section explains the seven elements of the primal code. Including concepts such as ‘the creation story’, ‘the rituals’, and ‘the leader’. Hanlon then shows how these parts come together to foster ‘primal belonging’.

Sections two and three then show how these immutable traits can be used by just about anyone or anything to market and promote their products.

The book is available in hardback, paperback, Kindle and also as an MP3 CD (hello 2011!). If you want to build a following that will shout your name from the rooftops and promote your brand freely, it’s an essential one for your reading list.

Amazon Link To Book: Buy The Book Now.

Book 3: Innovation from Desperation: The Unfiltered Failures & Successes of an OG Social Media Marketer

Author: Desiree Martinez

Number of pages: 234

Published: 2020

Why should you listen to her?: Desiree Martinez is an entrepreneur, YouTuber, and all-round social media guru. As a military spouse, a life moving from base to base with her Air Force husband left her with few career opportunities and forced her to act for herself and think entrepreneurially.

She was surprised to learn that Facebook, a platform she knew well from her college days, was becoming an essential platform for businesses. So she started a social media consulting firm and has since helped hundreds of businesses shape their social presence.

Book Synopsis:

My 5* review for this book which I posted to Amazon reads:

“A real heartfelt walk through the ups and downs of working in media and social media in this current age. Running a business, raising a family and growing a brand is not easy. This is a warts and all story sharing some truly inspirational lessons. Well worth a read!”

The book is part autobiography and part how to launch your own business. It provides an unfiltered account of the ups and downs of launching a business with little support and no roadmap.

There are many lessons to learn from the book. Desiree covers topics like becoming a better content creator, what to do when a new social media platform becomes hot, and how to keep on going when everything seems to conspire against you.

Released in 2020, it also contains a chapter covering the impact of the pandemic. It’s a book to read if you can’t see yourself in any of the thousands of books available about entrepreneurship. Desiree says that she was the girl at school you who would never think could launch their own business, never mind write a book!

If that sounds like you, then this is a book worth reading.

The book is available in paperback and on Kindle, and it’s one I really recommend that you read.

Amazon Link To Book: Buy The Book Now.

Book 4: The 4-Hour Workweek

Author: Tim Ferris

Number of pages: 416

Published: 2011

Why should you listen to him?: Tim Ferris is a writer, podcaster, investor, and entrepreneur. Many know him today for his podcast about lifestyle and smart working, but it was this book – The 4-hour Work Week – that propelled him onto the global stage.

He has advised or invested in many well know internet startups, like Evernote, Stumbleupon, and Uber.

Book Synopsis: One of the best books about entrepreneurship available to read.

Ferris argues in this now-famous book about how you should strive to avoid the 9-5 and instead choose to live life on your terms by building lifestyle businesses.

Ferris writes about how he started work after college and found himself working 80 hours a week for $40,000 a year. After a little experimentation with various business ideas and working strategies, he launched his own brand of supplements and soon started earning $40,000 every month, working just 4 hours per week.

Ferris achieved his success by working smartly. He used the 80/20 principle made famous by Italian economist Pareto and outsourced most menial tasks to cheap virtual assistants overseas.

The 4-hour Work Week gives you the tools and the inspiration to build a business of your own, and enjoy the benefits while you are still young by taking ‘mini-retirements’.

Essentially, you design and launch a business that can operate day-to-day without your presence. Something that earns money on autopilot so you can head out into the world and seek out unforgettable experiences.

The book is in four parts; Definition, Elimination, Automation, and Liberation. Each step in the framework guides you through his approach to building a lifestyle business and contains lots of real-life examples to illustrate the points.

The book is available in hardback, paperback, Kindle, and audio CD. It’s become a classic of the genre and regularly makes it into top-10s of books about entrepreneurship.

Amazon Link To Book: Buy The Book Now.

I hope you find this list of books useful.

Remember, if you sometimes struggle to find the time actually to sit down and read; there is an alternative. You can listen to a book when you are out and about—maybe travelling to work or out getting coffee.

You can download and listen to many useful books about YouTube and entrepreneurship using Amazon Audible. Every month for a small monthly subscription, you can listen to a book often narrated by the author themselves.

Educating yourself is the single best thing you can do for your career, so why not try listening to two of the books mentioned above with a 30-day trial of Amazon Audible.

Categories
HOW TO MAKE MONEY ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

Do YouTubers Get Paid if I Use AdBlock?

Ads can be annoying; there’s no avoiding that.

From the early days of the Internet, when pop-up windows could take over your screen, to the more recent iteration of in-site advertising which is suspiciously reminiscent of those early pop-up windows, it can be incredibly frustrating.

YouTube is not exempt from this, of course. Sure, they don’t throw annoying overlays and pop-up windows in your face, but there is a special kind of frustration that comes with clicking on a thirty-second meme video, only to be greeted with a twenty-second unskippable advert for a popular team management platform.

You know which one we mean.

It shouldn’t be surprising that more and more people are turning to AdBlock solutions to make their Internet browsing experience a little more palatable. It only takes one visit to a typical news site, with thirteen pop-up ads, a cookie warning, a request to send notifications, multiple unroll adds that slide the content you are trying to read out of sight, and unskippable pre-roll ads on the video content that the news site absolutely does not own the rights to, to make you want to install an ad blocker out of spite if nothing else.

But how does this affect your favourite YouTubers? We have reached a point where most of the people using the Internet are quite savvy, having either been born with the Internet already here, or having had decades to acclimatise to it. Most people understand that the adverts they are being forced to watch are supporting the content they are consuming. Granted, when it is a trashy tabloid newspaper whose abuse of advertising makes their product almost unusable, it’s tempting to not care that you’re taking some money out of their pocket. But when it’s your favourite YouTuber, especially if that YouTuber is an individual, and even more so if that YouTuber is a smaller, growing channel, it can give you pause.

If you’ve ever found yourself wondering “do YouTubers get paid if I use AdBlock?”, the answer is no… but also maybe. That’s right; this is yet another question with no clearcut answer. What we can say for certain is that if you are not seeing the ads being served on a video, the YouTuber who is responsible for that video is not getting any money from those ads.

However, there is more to earning money on YouTube than being served ads – assuming you don’t skip them, but that causes its own problems for YouTubers.

Keep reading, and we’ll take a deep dive into the likely impact your ad-blocking behaviour might be having on your favourite YouTubers, as well as ways you can assuage your guilt if you absolutely must keep your ad blocking software in action.

Do YouTubers Get Paid if I Use AdBlock?

How Do Ad Blockers Work?

When talking about regular webpages with ads in the sidebar or the main content, it is not hard to wrap your mind around how an adblocker does its thing, because it can merely edit the webpage code on the fly, snipping out the advertisement. It can also block pop-ups and redirects.

But what about videos? YouTube’s builds its pre, mid, and post-roll ads into the video itself, so how can an ad blocker prevent the ad without blocking the whole video?

Ad blockers have a variety of methods at their disposal, with one of the most versatile ones being the ability to block certain domains and URLs. If YouTube attempts to load an ad from a blocked domain, it will encounter the error, assume there is something wrong, and allow you to skip to the content.

There are a few different metrics that factor into how YouTubers earn from ads, but generally speaking, if a viewer doesn’t see at least the first two seconds of an ad, the YouTuber does not receive anything for that attempted ad view.

Youtube Community Tab: What It Is And How To Use It To Grow Your Channel. 19

Statistical Insignificance

Google is a big company, and they’re smart enough to get around ad blockers if they really wanted to.

The truth of the matter is that people who use ad blockers are so statistically insignificant compared to the people who don’t use them that companies like Google don’t deem it worth the effort to get into what would essentially become an arms race against the people making those ad blockers. In fact, the number of people who even know ad blockers are a thing is an overwhelming minority.

If YouTube were to start combatting ad blockers, it would lead ad blockers to find new ways to get around YouTube’s solutions, which would prompt YouTube to come up with new methods, and so on. As the world of DRM (digital rights management) has taught us time and time again, this kind of situation rarely ends well for the consumer.

The most likely outcome would be regular YouTube users who are just trying to watch content being inconvenienced by broken and unintuitive systems designed to stop ad blockers; meanwhile, the people using ad blocker would likely be unaffected as there will always be another workaround. There is also an argument to be made that Google getting into an ad block war would only draw more attention to the existence of ad blockers, thus increasing the usage of them and making it less of a statistically insignificant prospect.

One take away from this from the perspective of YouTube users who is worried about their ad blocking hurting their favourite YouTubers is that YouTube does not suffer from you blocking ads due to the small number of people who do it. But, the individual YouTuber who’s videos you are viewing may suffer, if they have a relatively small audience with a relatively high proportion of ad blocker users.

Am I Too Old to Start a YouTube Channel? 3

How Much Do Ad Blockers Impact YouTubers

Okay, here’s the truth; ad blockers don’t really harm YouTubers that much at all. Wait! We’re not suggesting you shouldn’t feel a bit guilty about this; you are undeniably preventing YouTubers from earning money when you block ads on their videos.

There’s no blurred edges or uncertainty about that, and you’re going to have to make peace with that if you want to continue blocking those ads (but we have a few ways to make things up to your favourite YouTubers below).

But the truth is, people who use ad blockers are so few, and individual ads are worth so little, that it just doesn’t make that much difference. For YouTubers barely making any money from their ads, missing a few cents they might have earned from you isn’t going to change their life. And for more successful YouTubers who make a small fortune from their ads, your few cents of ad plays won’t be noticed or missed.

Couple this with the fact that decreasing ad revenue from YouTube’s ads over recent years has led to a general shift towards other means of monetising content, and you have a growing argument for ads not being that important. Sure, YouTubers still use the YouTube Partner Programme to monetise their videos with ads, but it is rarely their only method. Things like Patreon, merchandise sales, and using YouTube to push viewers towards a product are increasingly more significant earners, and your ad blocker has no effect on those things.

Why Do YouTubers Ask for Likes?

What Can I do to Support YouTubers I Like?

No matter how we spin it, there is no getting away from the fact that using an ad blocker on a YouTube page is denying the YouTuber revenue.

It may be a small amount of revenue, but it is revenue nonetheless. It is natural—even expected—to feel a little guilty about this, especially for YouTubers you like and watch on a regular basis.

So, what can you do to make things right?

Turn Your Ad Blocker Off!

No doubt this will be the least popular suggestion we make, but it is the most effective. The truth is any time you block an ad; you are denying someone’s revenue. Even those news sites that go ridiculously over the top with their barrage of adverts are making content you must want to consume, so it’s only fair they get compensated for it. With YouTubers, turning off your ad blocker will ensure they earn the most revenue they can.

Selectively Turn off Your Ad Blocker

The next best thing is turning off your ad blocker for YouTube. Many ad blocker applications and plugins will allow you to “whitelist” some websites so that ads on those pages are still displayed. You may not want to let everyone in, but if you give YouTube the nod, you will be able to keep your ad blocker running while still supporting your favourite YouTubers. Unfortunately, the scope of this functionality is usually limited to domains, meaning you would have to allow ads for all of YouTube, not just the YouTubers you approve of.

Find Other Ways to Support Your YouTubers

As mentioned above, YouTubers these days rarely rely on YouTube Partner Programme money alone. If you are unwilling to budge on the ad blocker front, you could always seek out one of these alternative methods and support them that way. This could include becoming a Patreon and supporting them with a monthly contribution, buying their merchandise or a product they are promoting, or even just sending them a direct donation through something like PayPal.

How to Make, Edit and Upload a YouTube Video Without a Camera 19

Can I get in Trouble for Using Ad Blocker?

Though the legal landscape of the Internet is an everchanging animal, there are no realistic situations in which you would get into any sort of legal trouble for using an ad blocker. Of course, we are obligated to point out that this is not a legal blog, and nothing we say here constitutes legal advice.

Right now the consequences of using an ad blocker (when there are any consequences) are usually just a message saying that a site has noticed you are using an ad blocker and politely asking you to turn it off. In reality, those sites usually have no way of knowing you are using an ad blocker, and instead use other tricks to get that message in front of your eyeballs. The important part here is that if they don’t know you are using an ad blocker, they can’t “punish” you for it.

If you were discovered to be using an ad blocker on a random site, they would have to sue you to extract any compensation from you using the legal system. And, given the cost of a lawsuit vs the material losses you might have cost them, suing you is incredibly unlikely.

Internet advertisements are typically worth pennies per view.

For sites you visit more frequently, and services you might be signed up to, there is always a possibility of being banned from that site or service, though this also is very unlikely. It is not a particularly difficult task to have a website block access to the content for people using ad blockers (it is also not that difficult for someone who knows what they are doing to get around that block) so you may find some content out of reach.

For YouTube, as we mentioned, right now, they don’t seem to care, and that is unlikely to change any time soon.

Conclusions

There is no getting around the fact that, when you block advertisements from showing, someone is losing out on potential earnings.

How you feel about that is your business, but we often build a more personal relationship with our YouTubers than we do with a site like Buzzfeed, or Cracked, and that can lead us to want to do right by them.

Turning off your ad blocker is the best thing you can do, but we understand why some people are reluctant to do that. If you can whitelist certain websites, consider allowing ads on YouTube if nowhere else.

And, finally, if all else fails, you can look for a way to support your favourite YouTubers more directly, such as through their Patreon, or even directly through PayPal or a similar service.

Ultimately, the impact of ad blocker users on the Internet as a whole is not that significant, given how little individual ad views are worth, and how few people use ad blockers.

Still, it doesn’t hurt to be mindful about things like this. Support your favourite creators, or they might not be creating the next time you check-in.

Categories
TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

How to Record YouTube Videos Outside

Any discussion about shooting a good video—or taking a good picture, for that matter—will inevitably come down to lighting.

Once you get beyond the quality of bargain-basement cameras, lighting is quite possibly the single most significant factor in making your video look good.

If you have the space and money to create a studio space for your videos, this can be a very easy task to accomplish, as you can control every aspect of your lighting with a fine-toothed comb. You can acoustically treat your studio to get the best possible sound, and sound-proof it to ensure your videos aren’t full of background noise from passing cars or people talking.

Shooting outside, on the other hand, can be a little hit and miss. It is much harder to control those environmental factors and, for the most part, you will often find yourself at the mercy of mother nature. Still, that doesn’t mean there aren’t plenty of tips and tricks for us to share with you!

Let’s get into how to record YouTube video outside.

YouTube Tips for Parents 3

Patience is Key

If you are relying on nature to provide you with the ideal conditions for your video, you will have to accept that you are on nature’s schedule. You won’t be able to make concrete plans, which can make recording videos that involve other people or time-sensitive components (equipment rental, for example) tricky.

Granted, if you live in LA and you need a hot, sunny day for your video, you most likely won’t have to wait long to head outside and record your video. I

f you live in Manchester, England, on the other hand, hot sunny days are much fewer and far between. Couple this with the unreliable nature of weather forecasts, and you have a recipe for frustration.

Of course, you can plan for bad weather, bringing lighting rigs and specialist audio equipment, perhaps even shelter from rain and wind. But you may reach a point where you have so much equipment working to cancel out the unwanted effects of being outside that you may as well just go back inside and record there.

We understand that not every video idea is flexible, and you should want to make the best possible video and if that needs it to be shot outside, you will just have to do your best to plan around what universe throws at you. If you do have some flexibility—such as you would with a video that doesn’t require other people or lots of setting up, then put the video on the back burner if you have to, and be ready to head outside and shoot the next time the weather turns out good. Or bad—whatever you need.

How to Record YouTube Video Outside

Top Tips for Shooting YouTube Videos Outdoors

So what about when that perfect weather lands, and you are ready to head outside with your camera and make that YouTube video you’ve been planning? Let’s go over some tips for shooting outside.

Sunglasses: When to Wear Them

Generally speaking, you should avoid wearing sunglasses as much as possible when shooting a YouTube video. Eye contact is an incredibly powerful tool in establishing a connection with your audience. It helps to build trust and makes it more likely that any given viewer might become a subscriber.

That being said, you may find yourself filming in harsh sunlight. If you are having to screw your face up and squint your eyes, it’s time to don a pair of sunglasses, since your viewers aren’t likely to build that trust while you are gurning at them.

To sum up; if the sun isn’t affecting your ability to function, try to avoid wearing the sunglasses, but if you are having to squint to prevent damage to your retina, put them on.

How to Record YouTube Video Outside 1

Look for the Right Kind of Light

If you have even a basic understanding of lighting as it pertains to photography, you will know that diffuse lighting is always better than harsh lighting.

Harsh lighting—such as you would get from a single bright light source—creates sharp edges and a stark contrast between light and dark areas. This can be great for certain cinematic effects and things like silhouetting, but not so much if you are just talking into the camera. Diffuse lighting, on the other hand, spreads more evenly over the subject and has much softer edges between light and dark areas.

Unfortunately, sunlight is the very definition of bright light from a single point, and on a bright, clear day, harsh light is unavoidable. So how do you get diffuse light when shooting outdoors? Well, if you consider how you would get it with indoor lighting—by having the light reflect off of or pass through a diffuse material, one solution springs to mind—clouds.

If you can shoot during an overcast part of the day, the clouds will act as a natural diffuser for the sun. Another natural diffuser is snow which works by reflecting the light back up, rather than obstructing it on its way down.

Of course, both of these options rely on certain conditions being true outside and, as we established earlier, that’s a risky game to play, especially if you live somewhere hot and dry, where snow and clouds are rare. If you are shooting at darker times, such as dawn, dusk, and night time, you can always use a typical lighting rig to get that nice diffused light, but if the restrictions you face force you to record during the middle of the day under a cloudless, blazing sky, you will just have to make the best of it. Consider shooting in the shade if you can, and if even that is not possible, just make sure the sun is not shining directly into the camera.

How to Record YouTube Video Outside 2

Make the Most of Your Setting

Regardless of the reason you are filming outside, be sure to take full advantage of your setting when you shoot.

There may be plenty of outdoor channels on YouTube, but the overwhelming majority of videos on the platform are still shot indoors. If you are shooting outdoors—particularly if shooting outdoors is unusual for your channel—make sure you incorporate your surroundings into the video in a noticeable way.

It could be something as small as framing a shot so that the backdrop is more prominent than usual, or something more grandiose, like filming on a rooftop in the evening with the bustling lights of a city behind you. It could even be something ridiculous, like filming while sitting in a tree (be careful!), but don’t go to the trouble of filming outside if you’re not going to take full advantage of the visuals that nature provides you.

Use Common Sense Regarding Other People

As is sometimes the case on this blog, we need to make it clear that nothing you read here should be considered legal advice. We are not qualified to give it, and the various laws across different regions and countries would make it impossible to give comprehensive advice in any case. Always check your local laws before doing something that could potentially land you in trouble.

There are two things to consider when recording in public regarding other people—what is illegal, and what is legal but might land you in a sticky situation regardless.

For many places in the western world, it is perfectly legal to record people in public. The exception to this rule is often some variant of them having a “reasonable expectation of privacy”, which is very hard to claim in a public place. As an example, gyms, while not technically a public space, can choose to allow cameras in the gym itself. If they did, a person would not be able to take legal action against you for filming them.

If you filmed then in the locker room, on the other hand, they have a reasonable expectation of privacy when they are getting dressed, and you could be in for some serious legal troubles, not to mention a reputation for some questionable behaviour.

How to Record YouTube Video Outside 3

There are also matters of harassment to consider. While you might legally be allowed to film someone in public despite any protesting they might make, if you follow them around all day against their wishes, you could end up in trouble for harassment.

The other side of this coin is what is legally allowed but could still be problematic. An example of this might be filming in a public park with children playing in the background. Parents are, somewhat understandably, wary of people filming their children without consent. Whether it is legal or not, they will likely ask you to stop, but it’s worth remembering that emotions can run a little high when you are talking about a parent and their child, so it’s entirely possible things could turn into a physical altercation. The point here?

If you want to film someone’s children, it would be a very good idea to seek permission first. And if you have no interest in filming children but there are children in your shot, maybe mention it to their parents, then they at least have the option to move their children if they don’t want them in your video.

It’s also worth noting that physical altercations are a possibility in any situation where you refuse to stop filming someone, even if you are legally allowed to do so. This may be a risk you will have to accept. Asking permission in advance can help avoid such situations.

The final thing to note here is the difference between public spaces and publicly accessible private spaces. The above example with the gym is a publicly accessible private space, whereas the park full of children would be a public space.

The vital difference here is that the gym may seem like a public space, but it is actually private, and thus it is entirely up to the gym owners what rules they want to set regarding filming and photography. So, if you are in publicly accessible private property, such as a store, gym, swimming pool, etc., and you are asked to put your camera away, do as they say.

In most cases, they will be required to ask you to stop filming before things escalate, but if they have to keep asking and you keep refusing, you will officially become a trespasser on their property, and that is a whole different bag of legal problems.

How to Record YouTube Video Outside 4

Phones!

One of the most significant issues you face when filming outside is dragging your equipment around.

If you have a bulky (by today’s standards) camera, a tripod, a full audio setup, and a lighting rig back home, the thought of dragging all of that equipment outside will understandably be a little daunting. There is an alternative, however, and it is in your pocket.

Or, you know, wherever your phone is right now.

Few phone features have received quite as much attention as cameras in recent years, with every manufacturer from the big boys down to budget models placing a significant emphasis on what their phone’s camera can do. The end result of this little arms race is that you get to take advantage of some remarkably capable camera tech in a tiny package. Especially if you have one of the more premium models, like the latest iPhones or Samsungs, these cameras are not only far better than they have any right to be, given their tiny size, but they also make use of all manner of hardware and software trickery to make taking great photos and shooting amazing videos as easy as possible.

Can a premium phone shoot video that is as good as a high-end recording setup that cost a few thousand dollars?

No, of course not. But it can certainly shoot great video. And, remember, you’re not comparing your phone’s video capabilities to what you can achieve at home in your studio, you are comparing it to what you can realistically achieve outdoors.

High-end phones have plenty of tech to compensate for things like over-exposure and low light, so you could well find yourself deciding that your phone produces better video than just dragging your camera outside, and is also more practical than carrying your whole recording set up outside.