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Top Languages on YouTube [All The Stats!]

YouTube is a truly global platform. With the exception of a few countries where, for mostly political reasons, the service is banned (and even in those countries people find a way to watch YouTube) it is used in just about every developed nation in the world.

It makes sense then that the languages used on the platform would be diverse and far-ranging.

It probably won’t come as a surprise to anyone to learn that English is the most-used language on YouTube, but there can be potential growth for your channel in the details of YouTube languages.

Specifically, knowing why certain languages are popular and how you can use those languages to increase your potential audience. In this post, we’re going to take an in-depth look at the top languages on YouTube, including where those languages are being spoken and, as a result, watched.

Top Languages on YouTube in Numbers

When discussing the languages used on YouTube, the natural place to start is regions. Though it is not a hard rule, you can generally tie the most used languages on YouTube to the countries that use the platform the most. Let’s take a look at the top five countries by YouTube views.

Country Views
United States 916 Billion
India 503 Billion
United Kingdom 391 Billion
Brazil 274 Billion
Thailand 207 Billion

Now, on the face of it, it might seem pretty obvious why English is the most used language. After all, English is the primary language of the United States, and the US is responsible for almost twice as many views as India—the next country on the list. There is more to it, however.

Firstly, you will notice that the United Kingdom is third on that list, and their native language is also English.

Rank Language Estimated % of Total Videos Top 3 Countries by YouTube Users
1 English 52% United States, United Kingdom, Canada
2 Spanish 11% Mexico, Spain, Argentina
3 Portuguese 8% Brazil, Portugal, Angola
4 Russian 4% Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan
5 Arabic 3.5% Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Algeria
6 Malay 3% Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei
7 French 2.5% France, Canada (Quebec), Belgium (Wallonia)
8 German 2.5% Germany, Austria, Switzerland
9 Japanese 2% Japan
10 Chinese 2% China, Taiwan, Singapore

The first table was quite lopsided, but now you will note that English language nations combined are responsible for more YouTube views than the rest of the top five nations combined. But let’s go even deeper. India, which was part of the British Empire in the not-too-distant past, boasts an estimated 10% of its population can speak English. Given that India is the second-most populous nation in the world after China, that’s quite a considerable chunk of people. Moving on to Brazil, around 7% of their population list English as a significant language. For Thailand, over a quarter of the population speak English.

So, with all of this information in mind, let’s take another look at our table, but this time we’re going to re-allocate the English-speaking percentages of the non-English nations.

Primary Language Views
English 1,428 billion
Hindi 453 billion
Portuguese (Brazil) 255 billion
Thai (Thailand) 155 billion

Of course, we realise that just because 10% of Indians speak English doesn’t mean that the 10% are responsible for a proportional share of Indian YouTube views, or that them being able to speak English means they would watch English videos. These are not intended to be hard statistics; we are merely illustrating the potential views for these languages. For example, the quarter of Thailand that can speak English may prefer to watch videos in Thai, but they can watch videos in English. In contrast, only a statistically insignificant percentage of the United States would be able to watch a video in Thai.

You will no doubt have noticed now that the top languages have become even more lopsided. At 1,428 billion, English speakers are almost double the combined total of the other three languages (863 billion).

Of course, the reality of these numbers is much messier than our tables suggest. For example, only 78% of the United States list English as their primary language. And the “primary” part is important, especially in cases like the 27% of Thailand that speak English—the fact that they speak English does not mean they don’t speak Thai. But even with these reality checks, it’s hard to ignore that the overwhelming majority of YouTube viewers can speak English, even if it’s not their first language, which makes English the go-to choice for videos. The fact that the majority of YouTube users reside in English speaking countries only serves to reinforce this bias, since most people only upload videos in their primary language.

Should I Make Videos in a Language Other Than my Own?

The ultimate gatekeeper to YouTube success is the quality of your content. If you are not a native English speaker you are, unfortunately, missing out on a significant demographic in your potential audience, but if you can’t make videos in English, you will not gain anything by trying, and you may even harm your channel in the process.

YouTube’s recommendation algorithm pays attention to things like watch time and whether people hang around when they land on one of your videos. If you attempt to make a video in a language you are not comfortable with, and it is hard to understand and puts people off, YouTube may take that as a sign that your videos are not recommendable, which would have a negative impact on your native language videos.

If, on the other hand, you are comfortable in a language (or languages) other than your primary one, it can’t hurt to make videos for that language. However, there is a different problem to deal with, namely one of a cost-benefit nature.

Any given niche will only attract a small percentage of a demographic, whether that demographic is by age, gender, region, or language. Once you factor this in with the percentage of YouTube users that speak a given language and the percentage of those people that might be interested in your video, you could be looking at a very small potential audience gain.

For example, if we go back to the list of nations by most YouTube views that we cited above, you will find Japan down in the twentieth spot with 215 million views. The native primary language of Japan is, as you would expect, Japanese. However, the number of Japanese speakers across the world is relatively small. In fact, the total number of people around the world who speak Japanese is roughly the same as the percentage of Indians who speak English at around 125 million.

If you are Japanese and you can speak fluent English, it would be a no brainer to make videos in English, as it would open you up to a potential audience that is an order of magnitude larger than the audience you would have had with your native tongue. If, on the other hand, English is your primary language and you can also speak Japanese, the potential gains from making videos in Japanese may not be worth the extra effort you would have to put in.

All of this would come secondary to the content, of course. If you are making content that is designed for Japanese people, specifically, the size of the audience is irrelevant.

Making Your Videos Accessible in Languages You Don’t Speak

Learning a language is no small task, and learning it to the degree where you can speak it clearly enough to make YouTube videos is an even bigger feat. Fortunately, you have options.

Pay For Translations

The most expensive option is also the option that provides the best experience for your viewers. There are several services online that will translate a script for as little as a few cents a word, Rev for example, though you will then have to find a voice-over artist who speaks the language you are translating to.

For this option, it is crucial to go to a translation service that specialises in voice-over translation. Having your script translated by a standard translation service will almost certainly result in stilted, awkward speech, so if you are going to take this path, do it right.

There is presently no option for dubbing videos with alternative audio tracks, so you will have to create whole new videos for your alternative languages. You shouldn’t worry too much, though; you’re not likely to be cannibalising your own audience by splitting your views as the people who watch your alternative language videos will have been far less likely to watch the primary language video in the first place.

Subtitles

Subtitles are a great way to make your videos accessible to foreign languages and, depending on how much you are willing to invest in your channel, can even be free thanks to YouTube’s automated captioning and translation services. These will need turning on in your upload settings, but once they are, you can leave the subtitles for all languages to YouTube.

However…

As anyone who has used Google Translate (or any other automated translator) will be able to attest, translation tools aren’t always the most accurate option. Language is complicated, and though AI has provided a path to far more accurate translation, it’s not quite there yet. So, if you are prepared to spend a little money, you can get your subtitles translated professionally.

There are plenty of services online that will do this for you, and they will mostly be cheaper than the voice-over translations we mentioned above. It’s worth noting that if you choose to use this method or the translated voice-over mentioned above, you will need a script that can be translated.

If you script your videos, then you should be able to use your already-written script for this purpose.

However, if you are more of a free spirit when you record, coming up with your dialogue on the spot, there is always the option to pay for transcription services.

I use Rev for all my videos to help caption and translate all my content and broaden its appeal and boost rankings across the web. On their website they offer subtitling and close captioning from as little as $1.25 per minute in multiple languages. Best still it auto uploads to YouTube to make it painlessly easy to use.

How Important is it be Accessible in Other Languages

As with many things on YouTube, the benefits of having your videos accessible to people who speak a different language to you will vary depending on what you are making and who you are making it for.

For the vast majority of YouTubers, there is not a particularly large benefit to having your videos translated or releasing alternate-language versions of them.

It is not that there isn’t potential in those extra views, it is that the effort of producing these extra videos, or the cost of having them translated, is not justified by the benefits. And, while far from perfect, YouTube’s automated translation does do a passable job that would be enough for some people who are especially interested in your content.

For YouTubers who are making videos in a particularly small niche, it may be worth it, however. It is undoubtedly easier to get traction in a smaller niche, but you are, ultimately, working with a much smaller potential audience, which can make the effort of expanding that audience worth the hassle.

What’s more, expanding your audience by making your content accessible in other languages is a win-win situation, since it makes your potential audience larger without increasing your competition, such as would be the case if you increased your potential audience by broadening your niche. There may be YouTubers making videos in your additional language that compete with you, but they will only be competing in that language.

For extremely successful YouTubers, having your videos accessible to other languages becomes worth it again, not because of any significant increase in views as a result, but because the cost of making those videos accessible becomes less significant. For someone making videos for fun in the evening after their day job, paying $150 to have a video translated or transcribed and a voice-over made is not a particularly attractive prospect. But if your YouTube channel is regularly making you thousands of dollars a month, it can’t hurt to reinvest some of that money back into your channel.

Of course, not everything has to be a cost-benefit analysis. If you just want to make your content available to more people, regardless of whether the benefit is worth the effort, the tools are there for you to do so.

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube

Very quickly before you go here are 5 amazing tools I have used every day to grow my YouTube channel from 0 to 30K subscribers in the last 12 months that I could not live without.

1. VidIQ helps boost my views and get found in search

I almost exclusively switched to VidIQ from a rival in 2020.

Within 12 months I tripled the size of my channel and very quickly learnt the power of thumbnails, click through rate and proper search optimization. Best of all, they are FREE!

2. Adobe Creative Suite helps me craft amazing looking thumbnails and eye-catching videos

I have been making youtube videos on and off since 2013.

When I first started I threw things together in Window Movie Maker, cringed at how it looked but thought “that’s the best I can do so it’ll have to do”.

Big mistake!

I soon realized the move time you put into your editing and the more engaging your thumbnails are the more views you will get and the more people will trust you enough to subscribe.

That is why I took the plunge and invested in my editing and design process with Adobe Creative Suite. They offer a WIDE range of tools to help make amazing videos, simple to use tools for overlays, graphics, one click tools to fix your audio and the very powerful Photoshop graphics program to make eye-catching thumbnails.

Best of all you can get a free trial for 30 days on their website, a discount if you are a student and if you are a regular human being it starts from as little as £9 per month if you want to commit to a plan.

3. Rev.com helps people read my videos

You can’t always listen to a video.

Maybe you’re on a bus, a train or sat in a living room with a 5 year old singing baby shark on loop… for HOURS. Or, you are trying to make as little noise as possible while your new born is FINALLY sleeping.

This is where Rev can help you or your audience consume your content on the go, in silence or in a language not native to the video.

Rev.com can help you translate your videos, transcribe your videos, add subtitles and even convert those subtitles into other languages – all from just $1.50 per minute.

A GREAT way to find an audience and keep them hooked no matter where they are watching your content.

4. Learn new skills for FREE with Skillshare

I SUCK reading books to learn, but I LOVE online video courses.

Every month I learn something new. Editing, writing, video skills, how to cook, how to run a business – even how to meditate to calm a busy mind.

I find all of these for FREE with Skillshare – Sign up, pick all the courses you want and cancel anytime you need.

5. Shutterstock helps me add amazing video b-roll cutaways

I mainly make tutorials and talking head videos.

And in this modern world this can be a little boring if you don’t see something funky every once in a while.

I try with overlays, jump cuts and being funny but my secret weapon is b-roll overlay content.

I can talk about skydiving, food, money, kids, cats – ANYTHING I WANT – with a quick search on the Shutterstock website I can find a great looking clip to overlay on my videos, keeping them entertained and watching for longer.

They have a wide library of videos, graphics, images and even a video maker tool and it wont break the bank with plans starting from as little as £8.25 ($9) per month.

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Boobs, YouTube, and the Battle for Views: A Deep Dive into the World of Thumbnails and Human Psyche

Welcome to the wacky, wonderful world of YouTube, where the quest for clicks, likes, and subscribes is a never-ending battle. Today, we’re taking a deep dive into a question that has plagued creators and audiences alike:

Do boobs really get you more views on YouTube?

We’ll explore the psychology, stats, and examples in this fun and friendly article, so buckle up and let’s get going!

The Psychology of Attraction

Let’s start with the basic human instincts. From an evolutionary perspective, our brains are hardwired to be attracted to certain physical traits that signal fertility and good health. For instance, the sight of a voluptuous bosom could evoke feelings of attraction as it suggests a potential mate who can nurture offspring. This is true for both men and women, albeit to varying degrees.

In the context of YouTube, this primal attraction can translate to more clicks on thumbnails featuring boobs, as it plays on our brain’s reward centre that’s geared toward seeking pleasure.

However, it’s important to note that other factors like humour, facial expressions, and intriguing visuals can also trigger the same reward centre, leading to more clicks and views.

Boobs, YouTube, and the Battle for Views: A Deep Dive into the World of Thumbnails and Human Psyche 2

The Stats: Boob-Thumbnails vs. Non-Boob-Thumbnails

Quantifying the “boob effect” on YouTube views is tricky, but some anecdotal evidence and informal studies have shown a correlation. For example, YouTuber Philip DeFranco conducted an experiment in 2012 where he alternated between boob and non-boob thumbnails for his daily vlogs. The result? Videos with boob thumbnails received significantly more views.

However, this isn’t a universal truth. A thumbnail featuring boobs may initially attract attention, but if the content is low-quality or irrelevant, viewers will leave quickly, causing watch time to suffer. In the long run, YouTube’s algorithm prioritizes watch time and engagement, so the short-term gains of a clickbait thumbnail might not translate to sustained growth for a channel.

While these statistics do not directly relate to the use of boob thumbnails on YouTube, they do demonstrate the enormous reach and influence of the platform.

Boobs, YouTube, and the Battle for Views: A Deep Dive into the World of Thumbnails and Human Psyche 1

Examples of Boob-Thumbnails in Action

There are numerous examples of creators using boobs in their thumbnails, whether they be gamers, vloggers, or pranksters. Some examples include:

  1. Prank Invasion: This channel gained notoriety for its kissing pranks, often featuring thumbnails of scantily-clad women.

Boobs, YouTube, and the Battle for Views: A Deep Dive into the World of Thumbnails and Human Psyche 3

  1. Zoie Burgher: A former Twitch streamer turned YouTuber, Zoie capitalized on her revealing outfits and thumbnails to amass a significant following.
  2. VitalyzdTv: Known for his wild pranks and social experiments, Vitaly often includes provocative images of women in his thumbnails.

While these examples highlight the potential for boobs to draw attention, it’s essential to note that these creators also rely on engaging content to maintain their audience.

In other words, the boobs may reel viewers in, but it’s the content that keeps them coming back for more.

Average YouTube Click-Through Rates

Ad Format Click-Through Rate
TrueView Ads 0.3%
TrueView Ads with CTA 0.76%
Bumper Ads 0.48%
Display Ads 0.47%
Overlay Ads 0.21%

(Source: Google)

Factors Affecting YouTube Click-Through Rates

Factor Impact on Click-Through Rate
Video Title The title is the most important factor in determining whether someone will click on a video, and can affect click-through rates by up to 40%.
Thumbnail The thumbnail is the second most important factor and can affect click-through rates by up to 30%.
Video Length Shorter videos tend to have higher click-through rates.
Video Quality High-quality videos with engaging content tend to have higher click-through rates.
Call to Action (CTA) Including a CTA in the video can increase click-through rates by up to 15%.

(Source: YouTube Creator Academy)

YouTube Click-Through Rates by Industry

Industry Average Click-Through Rate
Apparel & Accessories 2.26%
Beauty & Personal Care 1.14%
Consumer Electronics 0.85%
Food & Beverage 1.75%
Health & Fitness 1.23%
Home & Garden 1.26%
Travel & Tourism 1.04%

(Source: Google)

These statistics demonstrate the importance of factors such as video title, thumbnail, and quality content in determining click-through rates on YouTube. Additionally, the data highlights the variation in click-through rates across different industries on the platform.

So, do boobs get you more views on YouTube?

The answer is both yes and no. While using boobs in thumbnails can certainly grab attention, it’s only a piece of the puzzle. Engaging, high-quality content is crucial for maintaining an audience and appeasing the YouTube algorithm.

So, if you’re a content creator looking to boost your views, remember that there’s more to it than just flaunting some cleavage!

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Does Changing YouTube Titles Affect Views? The Surprising Impact on Your Videos

As a YouTuber, you may often find yourself asking, “Does changing YouTube titles affect views?”

The simple answer is yes, it can. Titles and descriptions are crucial components of your videos’ metadata and play a significant role in the overall success of your channel.

In this article, we’ll dive into the importance of titles and descriptions and explore how changing them can impact your views.

The Importance of Titles and Descriptions on YouTube

Titles and descriptions are not just labels for your videos; they help viewers understand what your content is about and determine if it’s relevant to their interests. They also play a significant role in YouTube’s search algorithm, affecting your video’s discoverability and ranking.

Why Titles and Descriptions Matter

Factor Importance
Relevance Viewers use titles and descriptions to decide if a video is worth watching.
SEO YouTube’s search algorithm relies on titles and descriptions to index and rank videos.
CTR Compelling titles and descriptions can increase your click-through rate and overall views.

Changing YouTube Titles: The Impact on Views

When you change a video’s title, you can potentially improve its discoverability and ranking in search results. A well-optimized title with relevant keywords can lead to increased views, as viewers are more likely to find and click on your video.

However, changing titles frequently or without proper research can have negative consequences. A poorly optimized title can result in decreased views and engagement.

Changing YouTube Descriptions: The Impact on Views

Similar to titles, modifying video descriptions can also affect your views. A well-crafted description with relevant keywords can improve your video’s search ranking, leading to increased views.

However, it’s essential to maintain a balance between keyword usage and readability. An overly optimized description that doesn’t provide value to the viewer can lead to a lower click-through rate and decreased views.

The Impact of Changing Titles and Descriptions

Change Positive Impact Negative Impact
Title Improved discoverability, increased views Decreased views, lower engagement
Description Improved search ranking, increased views Lower click-through rate, decreased views

Changing YouTube titles and descriptions can indeed affect your views. If done correctly, optimized titles and descriptions can lead to increased views, better engagement, and improved search rankings. However, it’s crucial to conduct thorough keyword research and maintain a balance between optimization and providing value to your viewers.

Remember that consistency is key, and making changes based on informed decisions and proper research will help you create a successful YouTube channel with a loyal following.

Don’t be afraid to experiment with your titles and descriptions, but always keep your audience and their needs in mind. Happy YouTubing!

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10 Reasons Why VidIQ Is a Must-Have Tool for YouTube Creators

If you’re a content creator on YouTube, you know that getting your videos seen by the right people can be a challenge.

That’s where VidIQ comes in.

VidIQ is a powerful YouTube SEO tool that can help you optimize your videos for search, improve your channel’s performance, and grow your audience.

I have used VidIQ for the last 5 years and grew my YouTube channel from 7K subscribers to over 45K! You can try it for FREE here.

Here are 10 reasons why you might want to use VidIQ:

Keyword Research

VidIQ offers a suite of powerful keyword research tools that can help you identify the best keywords to use in your video titles, descriptions, and tags.

By using the right keywords, you can increase your videos’ visibility in YouTube search results and attract more views.

Video Optimization Tips

VidIQ provides detailed optimization tips that can help you make the most of your video content.

From title and description recommendations to tag suggestions, VidIQ can help you optimize every aspect of your videos to improve their visibility and performance.

Analytics and Insights

VidIQ offers a range of analytics and insights that can help you understand how your videos are performing on YouTube.

From engagement metrics to audience demographics, VidIQ can help you track your progress and make data-driven decisions about your content strategy.

10 Reasons Why VidIQ Is a Must-Have Tool for YouTube Creators 1

Competitor Analysis

With VidIQ, you can also keep an eye on your competitors and learn from their success. VidIQ’s competitor analysis tools can help you identify what’s working for other channels in your niche and apply those strategies to your own content.

10 Reasons Why VidIQ Is a Must-Have Tool for YouTube Creators 2

Trend Alerts

VidIQ’s trend alerts feature can help you stay up-to-date with the latest trends in your niche. By identifying popular topics and keywords, you can create content that’s timely and relevant, and attract more views and engagement.

Thumbnail Generator

VidIQ’s thumbnail generator tool can help you create eye-catching and engaging thumbnails for your videos. By using VidIQ’s customizable templates and design tools, you can create thumbnails that stand out in search results and attract more clicks.

Best Time to Post

VidIQ can also help you determine the best time to post your videos for maximum engagement.

By analyzing your audience’s viewing habits and engagement patterns, VidIQ can help you schedule your content to reach the right people at the right time.

Comment Management

VidIQ’s comment management tools can help you keep track of comments on your videos and respond to your audience in a timely and efficient manner.

By staying on top of your comments, you can build stronger relationships with your audience and improve your channel’s overall performance.

Channel Audit

VidIQ’s channel audit feature can help you identify areas for improvement on your channel.

By analyzing your channel’s performance and suggesting ways to optimize your content, VidIQ can help you take your channel to the next level.

Or if you want a more personal hands on channel review I offer my own 1-on-1 consulting service and video calls.

Customer Support

Finally, VidIQ offers excellent customer support to its users. Whether you have a question about a feature or need help troubleshooting an issue, VidIQ’s support team is always ready to help.

In conclusion, VidIQ is a powerful tool for YouTube creators looking to optimize their content and grow their audience.

With its suite of keyword research tools, video optimization tips, analytics and insights, competitor analysis tools, and more, VidIQ can help you take your channel to the next level.

So if you’re serious about growing your channel and attracting more views and engagement, consider giving VidIQ a try.

Q: What is VidIQ?

A: VidIQ is a YouTube SEO and analytics tool that helps creators optimize their videos for search and grow their channel’s audience. It offers a range of features and insights that can help creators improve their content strategy, increase engagement, and attract more views.

Q: What features does VidIQ offer?

A: VidIQ offers a suite of features and tools, including:

  • Keyword research tools
  • Video optimization tips
  • Analytics and insights
  • Competitor analysis tools
  • Trend alerts
  • Thumbnail generator
  • Best time to post
  • Comment management tools
  • Channel audit
  • Customer support

Q: How does VidIQ help with keyword research?

A: VidIQ’s keyword research tools can help you identify the best keywords to use in your video titles, descriptions, and tags. By using the right keywords, you can increase your videos’ visibility in YouTube search results and attract more views.

Q: How can VidIQ help me optimize my videos?

A: VidIQ provides detailed optimization tips that can help you make the most of your video content. From title and description recommendations to tag suggestions, VidIQ can help you optimize every aspect of your videos to improve their visibility and performance.

Q: Can VidIQ help me analyze my audience and track my progress?

A: Yes, VidIQ offers a range of analytics and insights that can help you understand how your videos are performing on YouTube. From engagement metrics to audience demographics, VidIQ can help you track your progress and make data-driven decisions about your content strategy.

Q: How can VidIQ help me stay up-to-date with trends in my niche?

A: VidIQ’s trend alerts feature can help you stay up-to-date with the latest trends in your niche. By identifying popular topics and keywords, you can create content that’s timely and relevant, and attract more views and engagement.

Q: Can VidIQ help me create eye-catching thumbnails?

A: Yes, VidIQ’s thumbnail generator tool can help you create eye-catching and engaging thumbnails for your videos. By using VidIQ’s customizable templates and design tools, you can create thumbnails that stand out in search results and attract more clicks.

Q: How can VidIQ help me determine the best time to post my videos?

A: VidIQ can help you determine the best time to post your videos for maximum engagement. By analyzing your audience’s viewing habits and engagement patterns, VidIQ can help you schedule your content to reach the right people at the right time.

Q: Does VidIQ offer comment management tools?

A: Yes, VidIQ’s comment management tools can help you keep track of comments on your videos and respond to your audience in a timely and efficient manner. By staying on top of your comments, you can build stronger relationships with your audience and improve your channel’s overall performance.

Q: What is VidIQ’s channel audit feature?

A: VidIQ’s channel audit feature can help you identify areas for improvement on your channel. By analyzing your channel’s performance and suggesting ways to optimize your content, VidIQ can help you take your channel to the next level.

Q: How can I get support from VidIQ?

A: VidIQ offers excellent customer support to its users. You can reach out to VidIQ’s support team via email or social media for assistance with any questions or issues you may have.

Q: How much does VidIQ cost?

A: VidIQ offers both a free version and a paid version with additional features. The paid version starts at $7.50 per month and offers more advanced tools and analytics.

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Can YouTube Detect Fake Views?

When getting started on YouTube—or even when you’re established—it can sometimes be tempting to engage the services of one of those “10,000 views for $10!!!” offers you find on places like Fiverr. And, if you seek the advice of any knowledgeable YouTuber, you will likely be told to stay well clear of those bought views for a variety of reasons.

Ultimately, however, the damage done by fake views is mostly one of disappointment. You pay for thousands of views only to find that your revenue doesn’t change because none of the fake viewers are legitimately engaged with your content. Where things get a little dicier is when it comes to YouTube terms of service, since breaking those can get you kicked off of the platform. Of course, for YouTube to penalise someone for fake views, they first have to be able to detect those fake views. So, can YouTube detect fake views?

Yes. To a certain extent, YouTube can detect fake views and will take action to nullify those views, as well as potentially take action against any YouTubers who are suspected of wrongdoing.

What do We Mean by “Fake Views”?

As with many things in the English language, the wording can get confusing when dealing with fake views. One of the main points of confusion is the use of “fake views” interchangeably with “buying viewers”, which may be true to some extent, but it is perfectly possible to buy viewers in a manner that YouTube deems acceptable.

We are, of course, referring to advertising. At the end of the day, paying advertising and other forms of promotion in which you pay money to promote your channel are forms of “buying views”, but YouTube does not have a problem with this. Not least because they hope you will use their advertising platform to promote your work

No, when we say “fake views” or “bought views”, we are referring to views that have been bought by the amount. Paying money for a guaranteed number of views will almost always fall afoul of YouTube terms of service, which takes a hard line against anything that artificially increases the number of views, likes, comments, or any other metrics you might care to pad out.

The use of the word “artificial” in that sentence is important. You see, if you just went out and paid 10,000 people to watch your video, like or dislike as they deemed fit, and drop a comment based on their actual thoughts about the video, YouTube probably wouldn’t have a problem. Those users would be engaging with the content and the fact that you paid them to do it wouldn’t be an issue.

The reality of fake views is not that, however.

Fake views are nearly always either bots or a captive audience, such as users who are being paid pennies to watch thirty seconds of video. These views are not worth anything to YouTube since they are not going to click on ads or dive further into the site where they can accumulate value for the platform.

This is not just bad in the sense that the fake view isn’t earning YouTube any money, but it’s also bad in the sense that it skews their advertising performance metrics. The more views that don’t result in clicks through to advertisers, the less appealing YouTube becomes for said advertisers.

Needless to say, it’s in YouTube’s best interests to crack down on fake views.

Can YouTube Detect Fake Views? 1

Can YouTube Detect Fake Views

So, with all of that in mind, can YouTube detect fake views? We said in a somewhat cagey fashion that they can, but what does “to a certain extent” mean?

Simply put, YouTube can make educated guesses about views based on a variety of factors. Things like IP addresses and their watching habits, how long views last, the views per hour ratio of a video or channel, and where the traffic sources for these views are.

All of these things and more are considered and allow YouTube’s systems to paint a picture of the user viewing a video. If there is a high probability that a view is fake, YouTube will treat it as such.

Will I Get Banned for Buying Fake Views?

You may get lucky. YouTube has been known to erase fake views without taking any action against the YouTuber whose videos were viewed. It is likely YouTube factors in the magnitude of fake views and whether a channel has a history of getting fake views. If you buy a few thousand fake views once, you will probably be safe from the ban hammer. If you buy tens of thousands every week, you’re going to get caught.

That being said, always remember that YouTube’s terms don’t specify an amount. Fake views are fake views, and you could have your channel erased if you buy them.

Do Fake YouTube Views Work?

The golden question then becomes; is there any benefit to fake views. And is that benefit worth the risk? Unfortunately, we have to come down on the side of no, there is no worthwhile advantage to fake views.

As mentioned, these views do not engage with your content, meaning they don’t earn you ad revenue or click your affiliate links or sign up to your Patreon. Worse still, they negatively affect your channel. Having a high volume of views with a poor engagement rate reflects badly on your content in the eyes of YouTube, and this could lead to your videos getting recommended less!

Final Thoughts

There are many shady things that can be done to increase your chances of success online, including on YouTube. But when the negative impact of buying fake views is weighed along with the risk of getting caught and suspended from the platform, it’s hard to make a case for buying fake views.

Building your audience organically will ensure that your viewers are engaged, there for the long haul, and, above all, you will be safe from being caught out by YouTube!

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube

Very quickly before you go here are 5 amazing tools I have used every day to grow my YouTube channel from 0 to 30K subscribers in the last 12 months that I could not live without.

1. VidIQ helps boost my views and get found in search

I almost exclusively switched to VidIQ from a rival in 2020.

Within 12 months I tripled the size of my channel and very quickly learnt the power of thumbnails, click through rate and proper search optimization. Best of all, they are FREE!

2. Adobe Creative Suite helps me craft amazing looking thumbnails and eye-catching videos

I have been making youtube videos on and off since 2013.

When I first started I threw things together in Window Movie Maker, cringed at how it looked but thought “that’s the best I can do so it’ll have to do”.

Big mistake!

I soon realized the move time you put into your editing and the more engaging your thumbnails are the more views you will get and the more people will trust you enough to subscribe.

That is why I took the plunge and invested in my editing and design process with Adobe Creative Suite. They offer a WIDE range of tools to help make amazing videos, simple to use tools for overlays, graphics, one click tools to fix your audio and the very powerful Photoshop graphics program to make eye-catching thumbnails.

Best of all you can get a free trial for 30 days on their website, a discount if you are a student and if you are a regular human being it starts from as little as £9 per month if you want to commit to a plan.

3. Rev.com helps people read my videos

You can’t always listen to a video.

Maybe you’re on a bus, a train or sat in a living room with a 5 year old singing baby shark on loop… for HOURS. Or, you are trying to make as little noise as possible while your new born is FINALLY sleeping.

This is where Rev can help you or your audience consume your content on the go, in silence or in a language not native to the video.

Rev.com can help you translate your videos, transcribe your videos, add subtitles and even convert those subtitles into other languages – all from just $1.50 per minute.

A GREAT way to find an audience and keep them hooked no matter where they are watching your content.

4. PlaceIT can help you STAND OUT on YouTube

I SUCK at making anything flashy or arty.

I have every intention in the world to make something that looks cool but im about as artistic as a dropped ice-cream cone on the web windy day.

That is why I could not live on YouTube without someone like PlaceIT. They offer custom YouTube Banners, Avatars, YouTube Video Intros and YouTube End Screen Templates that are easy to edit with simple click, upload wizard to help you make amazing professional graphics in minutes.

Best of all, some of their templates are FREE! or you can pay a small fee if you want to go for their slightly more premium designs (pst – I always used the free ones).

5. StoryBlocks helps me add amazing video b-roll cutaways

I mainly make tutorials and talking head videos.

And in this modern world this can be a little boring if you don’t see something funky every once in a while.

I try with overlays, jump cuts and being funny but my secret weapon is b-roll overlay content.

I can talk about skydiving, food, money, kids, cats – ANYTHING I WANT – with a quick search on the StoryBlocks website I can find a great looking clip to overlay on my videos, keeping them entertained and watching for longer.

They have a wide library of videos, graphics, images and even a video maker tool and it wont break the bank with plans starting from as little as £8.25 ($9) per month.

Categories
DEEP DIVE ARTICLE HOW TO GET MORE VIEWS ON YOUTUBE SOCIAL MEDIA YOUTUBE

How to Start a YouTube Channel

Whether you are considering starting a YouTube channel for business or pleasure, the allure of that big red play button can be hard to resist. YouTube is proven to be a great medium for expanding a brand, bringing attention to your business, or just connecting with an audience over something you are passionate about. And it is for these reasons that so many people want to start a new YouTube channel, even now when there are so many channels out there.

In this post, we’re going to look at some of the mechanical aspects of starting a channel, as well as some tips for how to go about getting those first views, but we wanted to start off by reaffirming your desire to start a channel (we’re assuming you do want to if you’re reading this!)

Is It Worth Starting a YouTube Channel?

One of the main roadblocks to a successful YouTube channel is a reluctance to pull the trigger on that “create channel” button. This can happen because of a variety of reasons—most of which we’ll cover in more detail in a moment—but the important thing to remember is that new channels are being created all the time, and plenty of YouTubers who are successful today started out recently or were shy to begin with or thought their chosen topic wouldn’t get much interest.

Ultimately, the majority of YouTube channels do not achieve the kind of success their creator hopes for, we can’t deny that. Whether they want to achieve financial independence through their content, become an internet megastar, or just find a small audience that is interested in what they are interested in, most don’t make it. But the one thing you can be certain of is that if you don’t start a channel at all, you definitely won’t succeed.

With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the biggest reasons why people don’t start YouTube channels at all. And then tell you why you shouldn’t let those reasons stop you!

How to Start a YouTube Channel 1

“I’m Too Shy”

Many would-be YouTubers love the idea of starting a channel, but when faced with the prospect of sitting in front of a camera and speaking to strangers on the Internet, they soon find themselves wilting away from the idea.

We’re not going to tell you that the shyness just goes away—though it does get less severe if you stick at it—but we can tell you that you don’t necessarily have to fight that shyness to run a YouTube channel.

There is more than one way to make a YouTube channel, and not all of them involve showing your face. In fact, it’s entirely possible to run a successful YouTube channel without showing your face or speaking! Granted, the style would have to work with your content, but many popular channels are clips shows, use virtual characters in place of on-camera appearances, and make use of text-to-speech technology.

“My Interests Are Too Niche”

Okay, we won’t lie and say there is no such thing as a “too niche” topic when it comes to an entire channel. You can certainly limit your potential audience to the point that you’re never going to hit those YouTube Partner Programme goals if you choose something extremely obscure.

That being said, assuming your interest is not so niche that you could start a support group for it and get everyone in a single room, being niche is actually a good thing!

Having a niche subject matter makes it easier to get noticed and build an audience when you are first starting out. It’s generally better to be laser-focused at the start of your YouTube career, build a small audience, and then gradually expand your niche to broaden the potential audience. So your niche interest could actually be the thing that makes your channel succeed.

“I’m Too Late to the Game!”

YouTube is easily the most popular platform for user-generated video content at the moment, and that popularity can make it a little intimidating to dive in yourself. With so many people already on the platform publishing videos, how can you hope to make a splash of your own?

It’s true that it can be hard to make an impact on YouTube when you’re just starting out, but it is far from impossible. In reality, the vast majority of successful YouTube channels got started under these circumstances. Whether there are two million or twenty million other channels, you’re still going to be trying to make your mark in a very crowded room.

Ultimately, if you release good content on a regular basis, you stand a good chance of succeeding on YouTube, regardless of how many channels are already taking up space on YouTube’s recommendations page.

How to Start a YouTube Channel 2

How to Start a YouTube Channel

So, hopefully, we’ve convinced you that the excuses you’ve been making to yourself for why you shouldn’t start a YouTube channel aren’t valid, now let’s get to how you actually go about it.

Create a Channel

We said we’d cover the basic mechanics of starting a YouTube channel and we weren’t kidding. The first thing you need to do is create a YouTube account if you don’t already have one. There are no stringent requirements for creating an account; as long as you have an email address, you should be good to go. After that simply follow these steps;

  • Sign in to your YouTube account and click on the user icon at the top right-hand corner of the page.
  • Click the gear icon to open up your YouTube account’s settings page.
  • Click “create new channel”.
  • Choose “Use a business or other name”, enter the name of your channel and away you go!

Choosing Your Channel’s Name

The last part of that list—entering the name of your channel—obviously requires you to know what name you’re going to use. It’s worth putting a good deal of thought into this part of the process before getting started, as changing your channel’s name after it is established can be a bit of a headache.

Now, we want to stress that, while this decision is important, it should not be a decision that keeps you from starting a channel. There is a fine line between giving something due consideration and using that consideration as an excuse to not get started at all.

If you are starting a channel as part of a business or an existing brand, that should make naming a little easier. If you are starting a channel as an individual, it’s important to consider what you want for the channel’s future. For example, if you have plans to one day grow your channel to the point of having a team working on it, perhaps bringing other content creators on board, you will want to steer clear of using your own name, as that links the channel to you specifically, making it a little weird when other people are on there.

Alternatively, if your plans don’t involve anyone but you being in front of the camera, you should consider using your name in the channel name, as it will make it easier for you to parlay any YouTube success into success in other areas.

Set Up Your Channel

With your channel made, you need to spend some time setting up your channel. This means adding things like profile and header images and filling out your about section. You can also arrange how your channel page looks, but don’t worry too much about this until you have a few videos uploaded.

In your about section, make sure you explain what your channel is about, but try to keep it as clear and concise as possible. Many viewers won’t even click to expand the about section, so try to get the basic premise of your channel into the first sentence, but in a way that grabs the reader’s attention.

If you are tying your YouTube channel to something larger—such as a business, brand, or other personal projects—be sure to put links in your information. These should show up in the top right-hand corner of your channel pages, just below the header image.

How to Start a YouTube Channel 3

Start Making Videos

The most important part of being a YouTube is, of course, being a YouTuber! Simply picking out a good name and creating a channel isn’t much use if you don’t then create content for it, regularly.

There is a veritable cornucopia of excuses to not make videos, and we’re not saying they’re all bad reasons. But, as with the channel name choosing, you should not let this become a crutch that you use to stop yourself from doing the deed. Remember, the quality of your video can always improve. The quality of you can always improve. But there’s no reason you can’t be improving while you make content, and there is no better practice than doing.

Just make the best content you can, and always strive to improve.

Keep Going

Once you’ve gotten over that initial hurdle that so many people fall at, you just need to worry about sticking with it. This is one area where bloody-minded persistence isn’t necessarily the best road to take. You should be persistent, yes, but in a smart way.

By ensuring that your channel grows, you will find it much easier to stay motivated and keep putting out new videos. Here are some tips for ensuring that happens.

Work Your Niche

We touched on this before, but a good way to get started as a YouTuber is to really drill down into a niche, finding an audience through the simple act of providing them something that not many others are. And if it’s something nobody else is providing, all the better!

The problem with such a tight niche is that it can severely limit your growth potential. To give an extreme example, if you start a channel based around talking local news for a small town with a population of 700 people, you’re going to struggle to find millions—or even thousands—of viewers who are interested in your content.

As you grow, try to expand your niche slowly and organically to widen your potential audience.

Take Advantage of Search Engine Optimisation

You don’t have to become an SEO expert (though it will certainly help if you do), but you should familiarise yourself with the basics of optimising your videos for being found in YouTube search and even other search engines like Google or Bing.

Every video should have a descriptive title, an accurate description, and make full use of tags. If you’re not sure about this kind of thing, you can always sign up for a service like TubeBuddy.

Be Consistent

We’re not going to tell you that you need to upload new videos every day or week to be successful—many popular YouTube channels have upload schedules that involve months between videos—but you do need to be consistent.

If you start off uploading weekly videos and then abruptly don’t put out another video for a few months without warning, it will be a turn off for your viewers, and it will cause YouTube’s algorithm to question whether you are a reliable content creator.

Build a Community

Playing an active role in the community that arises around your channel will ensure you have some degree of influence over how that community develops. It will also give your viewers a strong sense of connection with your content.

You can do this in a number of ways, such as regularly replying to comments, or setting up and actively participating in a Discord server or subreddit.

Monetise Your Channel

When you reach a stage where monetisation is an option (whatever form that comes in), you should strongly consider doing it. YouTube doesn’t need to be about the money, of course, but it is hard work, and it’s much easier to motivate yourself to make time for it if you’re getting something tangible back.

Final Thoughts

YouTube continues to be the premier video platform for user-generated content, and there is still plenty of opportunity there for those willing to put the effort in.

So get out there and start making videos!

Categories
HOW TO GET MORE VIEWS ON YOUTUBE SOCIAL MEDIA YOUTUBE

Fake Views on YouTube [Are they worth it?]

YouTube is big business, and, unfortunately, that means a lot of people are willing to take risks to get an edge when searching for success on the platform. One of the more obvious ways of doing this is to literally buy your success. You can buy likes, subscribers, and, the focus of this post, views.

Unfortunately, life is rarely easy, and YouTube is no different. Shortcuts like these invariable end in metaphorical tears, so we thought we’d outline what we mean by fake views, and why you should steer clear of them if you want to succeed on the platform.

What Are Fake Views?

When we talk about fake views, we are not simply talking about views you have paid for. After all, when you pay YouTube to promote your channel through their advertising platform, you are essentially paying for views. The difference is that there is no guarantee on how many views you will get since you are paying for advertising.

The kind of fake views we are referring to are typically sold in amounts, and though there may be a margin for error in the number of views you actually get, the seller will often specify a number, and perhaps even guarantee that that as a minimum.

But how can that work?

Think about it, you can’t guarantee a viewer will want to watch any given video, that’s not how people work. The seller would have to have an enormous pool of YouTube viewers ready and waiting, spanning a diverse range of interests so that when you come along ready to pay for their eyeball time, the seller will be able to find enough viewers to meet the number of views they have promised.

And then there’s the compensation for those viewers. If you’re going to have a large pool of YouTube viewers on retainer, they’re probably going to want something in return. The promise of engaging content that interests them won’t be much of a draw, since that’s the same promise that YouTube makes for simply having an account. Then consider that you’re only being charged a few pounds or dollars (or whatever your local currency is) for these views, how much can the seller really offer these viewers?

Well, the answer is, of course, nothing. There are often no human eyeballs on the other side of these views, just bots. The seller can afford to give you 10,000 views for £5 (or whatever the going rate is) because they have already invested whatever time or money they need to in building their bot farm, and the rest is simply a matter of entering your video’s URL and clicking a button.

But, with that being said, are these views any good?

Do Fake Views Work?

Whether or not these fake views works is a subjective question, since “working” depends on what your goal is. If you just want to inflate your view counts for the appearance, then yes, fake views are effective. The numbers under your video will go up and it will look like you have far more viewers than you actually did.

This is a bit of a hollow game, however, since these views don’t translate into anything more than the numbers themselves. And, if you don’t have that many real human viewers, nobody will really care that you have tens of thousands of views.

What about more material metrics of success? Let’s face it, the thing most of us are concerned with when it comes to YouTube success is how much revenue our channel can generate for us. Well, that’s where fake views really start to fall apart as a path to success.

Revenue is generated from ad views and YouTube Premium subscriptions. Clearly, the fake viewer seller is not going to be buying YouTube Premium subscriptions for their bots—that would be a quick way to lose a lot of money. As for ad views, a sizable portion of ad views earn their money on interaction (clicking the ads) and bots don’t do that.

There is still money to be made from simply viewing an ad, of course, but YouTube—or, more specifically, Google—have built their business on selling advertising, and they’re not about to let that business collapse because advertisers are sick of wasting their money on fake views that don’t generate leads.

In other words, YouTube is very good at sniffing out fake views, and the improvement of that skill is one that is in constant and active development. It can also affect the numbers game we mentioned above since YouTube has been known to erase fake views from a video’s view count after the fact.

Another negative side of fake views is the way YouTube sees your channel. Even if a fake view gets through YouTube’s elite fake view defences, YouTube is going to see your channel getting a lot of views and very little engagement, which is a bad sign for your recommendation prospects. This means that, not only are fake views not helping you succeed in the short term, they can actively harm your chances of succeeding the right way in the long term.

Are Fake Views Allowed?

It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but fake views are not permitted under YouTube terms of service. Or, rather, you are not permitted to artificially inflate viewing figures.

Practically speaking, if you are not a serial offender, the worst you’ll face is probably your fake views being removed and your money wasted. That being said, YouTube could decide to take more severe action against you—such as banning you from the platform—and you should be prepared for that eventuality if you decide to take this risk.

Final Thoughts

Like many shortcuts in life, fake views are not worth it in the long term. And, with YouTube constantly improving their fake view prevention mechanisms, it is increasingly becoming the case that fake views offer little benefit in the short term, also.

It takes patience, but genuine, organic growth is the way to go, and there are plenty of resources right here on this blog to help you do just that!

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube

Very quickly before you go here are 5 amazing tools I have used every day to grow my YouTube channel from 0 to 30K subscribers in the last 12 months that I could not live without.

1. VidIQ helps boost my views and get found in search

I almost exclusively switched to VidIQ from a rival in 2020.

Within 12 months I tripled the size of my channel and very quickly learnt the power of thumbnails, click through rate and proper search optimization. Best of all, they are FREE!

2. Adobe Creative Suite helps me craft amazing looking thumbnails and eye-catching videos

I have been making youtube videos on and off since 2013.

When I first started I threw things together in Window Movie Maker, cringed at how it looked but thought “that’s the best I can do so it’ll have to do”.

Big mistake!

I soon realized the move time you put into your editing and the more engaging your thumbnails are the more views you will get and the more people will trust you enough to subscribe.

That is why I took the plunge and invested in my editing and design process with Adobe Creative Suite. They offer a WIDE range of tools to help make amazing videos, simple to use tools for overlays, graphics, one click tools to fix your audio and the very powerful Photoshop graphics program to make eye-catching thumbnails.

Best of all you can get a free trial for 30 days on their website, a discount if you are a student and if you are a regular human being it starts from as little as £9 per month if you want to commit to a plan.

3. Rev.com helps people read my videos

You can’t always listen to a video.

Maybe you’re on a bus, a train or sat in a living room with a 5 year old singing baby shark on loop… for HOURS. Or, you are trying to make as little noise as possible while your new born is FINALLY sleeping.

This is where Rev can help you or your audience consume your content on the go, in silence or in a language not native to the video.

Rev.com can help you translate your videos, transcribe your videos, add subtitles and even convert those subtitles into other languages – all from just $1.50 per minute.

A GREAT way to find an audience and keep them hooked no matter where they are watching your content.

4. PlaceIT can help you STAND OUT on YouTube

I SUCK at making anything flashy or arty.

I have every intention in the world to make something that looks cool but im about as artistic as a dropped ice-cream cone on the web windy day.

That is why I could not live on YouTube without someone like PlaceIT. They offer custom YouTube Banners, Avatars, YouTube Video Intros and YouTube End Screen Templates that are easy to edit with simple click, upload wizard to help you make amazing professional graphics in minutes.

Best of all, some of their templates are FREE! or you can pay a small fee if you want to go for their slightly more premium designs (pst – I always used the free ones).

5. StoryBlocks helps me add amazing video b-roll cutaways

I mainly make tutorials and talking head videos.

And in this modern world this can be a little boring if you don’t see something funky every once in a while.

I try with overlays, jump cuts and being funny but my secret weapon is b-roll overlay content.

I can talk about skydiving, food, money, kids, cats – ANYTHING I WANT – with a quick search on the StoryBlocks website I can find a great looking clip to overlay on my videos, keeping them entertained and watching for longer.

They have a wide library of videos, graphics, images and even a video maker tool and it wont break the bank with plans starting from as little as £8.25 ($9) per month.

Categories
HOW TO GET MORE VIEWS ON YOUTUBE TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

How to Promote YouTube Videos on Instagram

Instagram is an incredibly popular platform, but it isn’t always obvious how you can leverage that platform to promote your YouTube videos. Firstly, you’re promoting a video and Instagram is centred around images. Second, Instagram descriptions don’t support links.

Sure, you can paste the link to your video into the description, but your followers can’t click it. And, you all probably know, introducing extra steps in a call to action is a big no no. You want your viewers to have as little effort between them and your videos as possible.

Still, Instagram is a valuable platform, and there are more options for promoting your videos than just posting an image and putting a link in your description. In this post, we’re going to talk about how to promote YouTube videos on Instagram, so settle in, and let’s get started.

Make Your Instagram Account Valuable

This is the golden rule when promoting YouTube content on other platforms; your presence on that platform has to have some value to the people on that platform in its own right.

If your Instagram account only exists to post links to your latest videos, there isn’t much of a reason for people to follow it. After all, if they just wanted notifying about your latest videos, they would subscribe to you on YouTube. The point here is that you’re trying to attract new subscribers. If a person on Instagram doesn’t know you, they’re not likely to follow you for new video updates. And if they don’t follow you, you can’t promote content to them.

So, make your Instagram account valuable in its own right. Post unique content that works in the Instagram ecosystem. And, when we say unique, it doesn’t necessarily mean you need to make entirely new content just for Instagram. You can repurpose your existing content, but you should make sure that it fits for the platform, which might mean re-editing, or clipping parts of your videos.

How to Promote YouTube Videos on Instagram

Put a Link in Your Bio

Instagram may not support clickable links in the descriptions of your posts, but they do support them in your Instagram bio. You can take advantage of this to put your YouTube channel link in there, or you can update the link to point towards your latest video.

Either way, be sure to mention in the description of each post that there’s a link in your bio, so anyone interested in seeing more from you will know where to go to find it!

Use Hashtags

Hashtags are incredibly useful on Instagram, perhaps more so than Twitter—the platform that spawned them. Instagram is very generous with hashtags, allowing you to pack quite a few into your description. And you can always comment on your own video to get more hashtags in there.

The important thing isn’t to get as many hashtags as possible, however, it is to get the right hashtags. You want your tags to be relevant to your content, otherwise you’re just going to be putting your content in front of people who aren’t interested. Even more importantly, you should try to find the most specific tags related to what you do. We’re not saying don’t use the incredibly popular tags that have millions of posts, but also try to zero in on tags that perhaps just have a few thousand posts, or even mere hundreds.

Tagging your content with these tags will increase the chances of it being seen by the people who are interested in those topics. Sure, there will be fewer people in those topics in total, but they will be more likely to see your post, and more likely to be interested in its content.

Don’t Limit Yourself to Pictures

Instagram is known as a platform for posting images, but it has long-since branched out into video content. Of course, the video-viewing experience of Instagram is very different to YouTube, with shorter content being the order of the day.

Regular Instagram posts can be no longer than 60 seconds, while IGTV posts can be up to 10 minutes. If you are lucky enough to get verified by Instagram, you can post IGTV posts up to 60 minutes in length.

Think of Instagram as a cross between a bite-size version of YouTube and a teaser platform, where you can post enticing clips and smaller versions of your YouTube content to lure viewers over. But always keep in mind that the content you post (on average) should have value for your Instagram followers in its own right, and not just be a pure advertisement for your YouTube channel.

Link to Your Instagram Account on YouTube

This may seem a little counterintuitive seeing as this post is about promoting YouTube on Instagram, but as sad as it may seem, numbers matter. An account with plenty of followers will occupy a more authoritative space in the mind of people checking out your account than one with hardly any followers.

So, while it’s a very indirect way of helping, promoting your Instagram account through your YouTube channel—even if it’s only a link on your channel page—can actually help you in promoting your channel through Instagram. As always, be careful not to shove anything down your followers or viewers throats. Promote, but don’t go over board.

How to Promote YouTube Videos on Instagram 2

Don’t Neglect Stories

Instagram stories are an ideal medium for promoting your YouTube videos because they are short, they support hashtags, and you can insert links into them, giving your viewers a direct way to get to the content. And, with the addition of YouTube Shorts, you can use the same promotional videos for both Instagram and YouTube.

Final Thoughts

Like most popular social media platforms, Instagram is a valuable tool for promoting your YouTube content, but only if you approach it correctly. It is a different platform to Facebook, Instagram, Reddit, and all the other big players, and it needs to be treated as such. If you go in expecting to use Instagram exactly how you use Twitter, or just post your latest videos, you probably won’t find much success.

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube

Very quickly before you go here are 5 amazing tools I have used every day to grow my YouTube channel from 0 to 30K subscribers in the last 12 months that I could not live without.

1. VidIQ helps boost my views and get found in search

I almost exclusively switched to VidIQ from a rival in 2020.

Within 12 months I tripled the size of my channel and very quickly learnt the power of thumbnails, click through rate and proper search optimization. Best of all, they are FREE!

2. Adobe Creative Suite helps me craft amazing looking thumbnails and eye-catching videos

I have been making youtube videos on and off since 2013.

When I first started I threw things together in Window Movie Maker, cringed at how it looked but thought “that’s the best I can do so it’ll have to do”.

Big mistake!

I soon realized the move time you put into your editing and the more engaging your thumbnails are the more views you will get and the more people will trust you enough to subscribe.

That is why I took the plunge and invested in my editing and design process with Adobe Creative Suite. They offer a WIDE range of tools to help make amazing videos, simple to use tools for overlays, graphics, one click tools to fix your audio and the very powerful Photoshop graphics program to make eye-catching thumbnails.

Best of all you can get a free trial for 30 days on their website, a discount if you are a student and if you are a regular human being it starts from as little as £9 per month if you want to commit to a plan.

3. Rev.com helps people read my videos

You can’t always listen to a video.

Maybe you’re on a bus, a train or sat in a living room with a 5 year old singing baby shark on loop… for HOURS. Or, you are trying to make as little noise as possible while your new born is FINALLY sleeping.

This is where Rev can help you or your audience consume your content on the go, in silence or in a language not native to the video.

Rev.com can help you translate your videos, transcribe your videos, add subtitles and even convert those subtitles into other languages – all from just $1.50 per minute.

A GREAT way to find an audience and keep them hooked no matter where they are watching your content.

4. PlaceIT can help you STAND OUT on YouTube

I SUCK at making anything flashy or arty.

I have every intention in the world to make something that looks cool but im about as artistic as a dropped ice-cream cone on the web windy day.

That is why I could not live on YouTube without someone like PlaceIT. They offer custom YouTube Banners, Avatars, YouTube Video Intros and YouTube End Screen Templates that are easy to edit with simple click, upload wizard to help you make amazing professional graphics in minutes.

Best of all, some of their templates are FREE! or you can pay a small fee if you want to go for their slightly more premium designs (pst – I always used the free ones).

5. StoryBlocks helps me add amazing video b-roll cutaways

I mainly make tutorials and talking head videos.

And in this modern world this can be a little boring if you don’t see something funky every once in a while.

I try with overlays, jump cuts and being funny but my secret weapon is b-roll overlay content.

I can talk about skydiving, food, money, kids, cats – ANYTHING I WANT – with a quick search on the StoryBlocks website I can find a great looking clip to overlay on my videos, keeping them entertained and watching for longer.

They have a wide library of videos, graphics, images and even a video maker tool and it wont break the bank with plans starting from as little as £8.25 ($9) per month.

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10 YouTube Video Ideas Without Speaking

The realm of voiceless YouTube content is not perhaps as varied as, say, videos where the YouTuber is vocal but off-camera, but there are still plenty of ideas to choose from.

Whether you want to keep quiet because you’re very shy, don’t like your speaking voice, or perhaps you have a physical condition that prevents you from speaking, you can still take part in the great YouTube adventure.

Silent, Not Absent

It’s worth pointing out that videos without speaking are not necessarily videos where you are off-camera. Many people don’t want to speak on video because they are shy, and, for those people, it makes sense that they would not be on camera as well.

This post is going to focus purely on ideas for people who don’t want to speak, but if you’re looking for an option where you can be silent and off-camera, there are still plenty of options, including a few in this list!

10 YouTube Video Ideas Without Speaking

To the ideas! We’ve put together ten of what we feel are the most popular options for YouTubers making content without speaking.

These are by no means your only options, of course (feel free to let us know what we’ve missed), and you don’t need to stick rigidly to any single idea.

If you can comfortably combine more than one of these ideas and still make good content, by all means, have at it!

The important thing is that your content is enjoyable, and you are comfortable making it, which is not the same as saying you won’t have to work hard to be a success.

So, in no particular order, here’s our top 10 YouTube video ideas without speaking.

10 YouTube Video Ideas Without Speaking 1

1. Music Content

For anyone with a flair for making music, YouTube is a great outlet. And there are several niches within the music niche itself for you to express your creativity (or just show off your skill).

Guitar shredding is particular popular on YouTube, with a vibrant community of talented guitarists that all seem very happy to collab and share each others work. There are also plenty of videos on making music in unconventional ways, such as using household items as instruments, or sampling sneezes and turning it into a song. And this is only scratching the surface.

The good thing about this kind of content, of course, is that there is no need to speak to do it. If you are shredding on guitar, you only need to play. If you are making interesting sounds with a cool new synth, simply zoom in on the synth and hit record as your hands work their magic.

2. Gaming Videos

Not all gaming videos feature an excitable face in the corner of the screen, yelling and screaming and generally making a lot of noise—not there’s anything wrong with that if that’s your bag. Plenty of YouTube gamers have very successful channels making gaming content that is devoid of any spoken commentary.

The most obvious example of this kind of video is the always-popular pure gameplay video. Sometimes people just want to see the game in action, usually as a prelude to purchasing said game. In that case they will often prefer a YouTuber who is not talking over the top of the game.

However, you decide to put your content together, be sure to set yourself a clear purpose with your content. For example, if you are putting the spotlight on video games, be sure to show all the important aspects.

3. Pet Videos

Pet videos can come from your own pet (or pets) or other animal clips on YouTube (which we’ll cover in more detail below), but the broad concept, of course, is that videos feature animals.

They can be humorous clips of the animals doing silly things, point of view videos where you attach a camera to the pet’s collar and see what they get up to on their own, or even just a camera pointed at a litter of puppies of cage of hamsters.

In a world where livestreams of cats are popular, anything is possible.

4. Screen Recorded Tutorials

This one is a little trickier for the silent crowd but far from impossible. Screen recorded tutorial videos are an excellent way to learn how to use software.

They can be complete series on a specific project, smaller lessons on individual tasks.

Making this kind of video without using your voice does make things a bit more constrained, since you will be limited to things that can be explained clearly through text or, ideally, shown rather than explained.

If you decide to go down this route, it might be worth finding someone who is willing to “test” your videos before they go live, so you can catch anything that isn’t clear.

5. ASMR Videos

Most ASMR videos seem to contain a lot of whispering, but that’s not a requirement to make this kind of content.

As long as you have a good enough microphone to capture the sounds and plenty of items to make crinkly and abrasive noises, you can leave your vocal cords out of the equation.

6. Animated Videos

Animated videos can cover just about anything, since you can animate most things if you have the time and ability to do so. And, of course, you don’t need to voice an animation yourself, or indeed at all.

If your animation does need vocal work, you could always rope a friend in, or hire someone from a website like Fiverr.

It’s worth noting that animating is a very time-consuming process, and that if you need that explaining to you, this probably isn’t the avenue for you. We’re not saying you shouldn’t learn to animate, of course, but if you’re new to it, you will struggle with an entire YouTube channel based around it.

7. Compilation Videos

We hinted at this one in the pet video idea, but compilation videos are another great option for YouTubers who don’t want to or can’t speak in their content. A compilation video could be a rundown of the top crime novels, a series of amusing pet videos, the highlights from a particular niche on YouTube, or anything else that is a series of clips. For some videos of this type, you don’t even need to include text, as the title tells the viewer all they need to know.

Of course, we should stress that you should do everything you can to get explicit permission to use the clips you include (where permissions are required), as that can lead to problems with your channel’s standing further down the line.

8. Videos for the Hearing Impaired

For those of you proficient in sign language, or with experience teaching or assisting people with hearing impairments, YouTube could be a great opportunity for you to take your talent and make it more widely available.

Most hearing impaired viewers have to rely on captions to consume content which, let’s be honest, are neglected more often than not. Increasing the amount of content on YouTube that is created with hearing impaired people in mind can only be a good thing. And the world is your oyster with regards to what your videos are actually about.

9. Interesting Facts Videos

If you’re old enough to remember when MTV used to be a music channel, you might remember the VH1 show, Pop Up Video. This was a show that played music videos, but as the video was playing, pop-ups with little bits of trivia about the artist, video, and the song would keep the viewer entertained.

There is no reason this format can’t translate nicely over to YouTube. And, of course, it doesn’t need to be music videos. For one thing, there seems to be no end to the demand for break-downs and analysis of new trailers and product announcements these days.

10. Computer Generated Speech

This one is less of a specific video idea and more of an option that could be applied to any video idea. Computer generated speech has come a long way in recent years. And, while it’s still not too difficult to identify a computer generated voice, it’s considerably more natural sounding than it used to be.

Depending on the service you use and how many words you want to convert to speech, you may need to subscribe to a premium service to make this work, but it is certainly possible, and there are already plenty of YouTubers out there using computer generated voices in their content.

10 YouTube Video Ideas Without Speaking 2

Final Thoughts

If you only want to keep your voice out of your content (or you can’t speak), there are plenty of video ideas for you to choose from. Life gets a little more challenging if you also want to keep yourself off-camera, but again, not impossible.

Remember that good content will always win out. If you are producing content that is valuable—be it as entertainment or information—you will have viewers wanting to watch it. It won’t matter whether you are speaking or not, only that you are making videos that they want to see.

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube

Very quickly before you go here are 5 amazing tools I have used every day to grow my YouTube channel from 0 to 30K subscribers in the last 12 months that I could not live without.

1. VidIQ helps boost my views and get found in search

I almost exclusively switched to VidIQ from a rival in 2020.

Within 12 months I tripled the size of my channel and very quickly learnt the power of thumbnails, click through rate and proper search optimization. Best of all, they are FREE!

2. Adobe Creative Suite helps me craft amazing looking thumbnails and eye-catching videos

I have been making youtube videos on and off since 2013.

When I first started I threw things together in Window Movie Maker, cringed at how it looked but thought “that’s the best I can do so it’ll have to do”.

Big mistake!

I soon realized the move time you put into your editing and the more engaging your thumbnails are the more views you will get and the more people will trust you enough to subscribe.

That is why I took the plunge and invested in my editing and design process with Adobe Creative Suite. They offer a WIDE range of tools to help make amazing videos, simple to use tools for overlays, graphics, one click tools to fix your audio and the very powerful Photoshop graphics program to make eye-catching thumbnails.

Best of all you can get a free trial for 30 days on their website, a discount if you are a student and if you are a regular human being it starts from as little as £9 per month if you want to commit to a plan.

3. Rev.com helps people read my videos

You can’t always listen to a video.

Maybe you’re on a bus, a train or sat in a living room with a 5 year old singing baby shark on loop… for HOURS. Or, you are trying to make as little noise as possible while your new born is FINALLY sleeping.

This is where Rev can help you or your audience consume your content on the go, in silence or in a language not native to the video.

Rev.com can help you translate your videos, transcribe your videos, add subtitles and even convert those subtitles into other languages – all from just $1.50 per minute.

A GREAT way to find an audience and keep them hooked no matter where they are watching your content.

4. Learn new skills for FREE with Skillshare

I SUCK reading books to learn, but I LOVE online video courses.

Every month I learn something new. Editing, writing, video skills, how to cook, how to run a business – even how to meditate to calm a busy mind.

I find all of these for FREE with Skillshare – Sign up, pick all the courses you want and cancel anytime you need.

5. Shutterstock helps me add amazing video b-roll cutaways

I mainly make tutorials and talking head videos.

And in this modern world this can be a little boring if you don’t see something funky every once in a while.

I try with overlays, jump cuts and being funny but my secret weapon is b-roll overlay content.

I can talk about skydiving, food, money, kids, cats – ANYTHING I WANT – with a quick search on the Shutterstock website I can find a great looking clip to overlay on my videos, keeping them entertained and watching for longer.

They have a wide library of videos, graphics, images and even a video maker tool and it wont break the bank with plans starting from as little as £8.25 ($9) per month.

Categories
HOW TO GET MORE VIEWS ON YOUTUBE LISTS YOUTUBE

12 Super Simple YouTube Video Ideas Without Showing Your Face

YouTubers aren’t always the lively extrovert bunch they are often thought as.

Not every YouTuber is eager to plant their face in front of a camera for the world to see. Fortunately, thanks to the enormous range of variety within the YouTube audience, there is still plenty of things you can do on YouTube without showing your face.

Why Avoid Showing Your Face on YouTube?

The most obvious reason you might want to avoid showing your face on YouTube is because you are very shy or self-conscious.

There are arguments to be made about how it could be good to push through those discomforts, but that’s not what this post is about; we’re just looking to give you ideas to work within your current situation.

Of course, there are other reasons why you might want to keep your face off camera, the main one being anonymity. While there are some quite serious reasons for wanting anonymity (such as those living in a country with questionable laws about free speech), the most common reason is one of reputation.

Perhaps you’re a forward thinking parent who’s making slightly risque content and doesn’t want it to come back in ten years time when your child is old enough to be embarrassed.

Perhaps you’re a happily employed individual who makes content with unpopular messages and doesn’t want to get “cancelled” from your place of work. Maybe you have you no specific reason for wanting to keep your identity hidden, but you’d rather it not be out there just in case.

Whatever the reason, keeping your face off-camera is an important part of maintaining that anonymity.

Video Ideas Without Showing Your Face 1

Our 12 YouTube Video Ideas Without Showing Your Face

Now, to the bit you here for; our video ideas without showing your face. Of course, this list is not a definitive collection of all potential faceless video ideas, just the top ones in our humble opinion. If there’s something you think should be on this list, drop it in a comment!

And, as always, the best solution for you is the one that you are most comfortable with, but it doesn’t have to be a single idea. Don’t be afraid to experiment, mix and match, and create something that truly works for you.

1. Commentary

Commentary videos can cover a wide range of things, from commenting on live events to giving a kind of directors commentary style of video for a film or TV show. Another popular version of this type of video is reacting to new trailers and announcements.

The key point here is that, while your voice is a pretty crucial part of the formula, your face never needs to be involved if you don’t want it to. Just be careful not to breach any copyrights if you are doing something like commentary on a film.

2. Gameplay Videos

The gaming industry has steam rolled over the competition to become the biggest entertainment industry in the world, so there’s naturally a lot of content being made around it. With gameplay videos, the game is the focus, so you don’t need to be onscreen.

While the typical image of a gaming video is the Twitch streamer setup, including a face-cam in the corner, there is no requirement to make your gameplay videos with your face on display. Indeed, many gaming YouTubers have made very successful channels without ever showing their face, and some without speaking, either.

3. Screen Recorded Tutorials

Screen recorded tutorials can be thought of as basically the same as gameplay videos but for software instead of video games. Of course, you should also be teaching the viewer how to do something with said software, which is a bit of a departure from gaming, where you can literally just be playing the game.

With screen recording, you will ideally be showing the viewer how to perform specific tasks, or perhaps doing a series where you make something from start to finish using the chosen software. If you have expertise in any software, this could be a good niche for you.

4. Whiteboard Videos

If you have expertise in something like physics or mathematics, you could make whiteboard videos where you explain concepts and techniques while using the whiteboard as a learning aid, much in the same way that a classroom teacher would. Also, don’t let the name fool you; it doesn’t have to be a whiteboard specifically. You could also use pen and paper, chalk boards, or even digital tablets.

5. Meditation and Mindfulness Videos

Some people love to tune out of the world and take a moment with their own thoughts. The practice of mindfulness and meditation has been embraced widely over the last few years as a why to help people sleep, study or relax.

Make videos that people can unwind to, feel comfortable with or can meditate to like on the Meditation Mindfulness channel.

6. Crafting/Cooking/Building Videos

These types of videos obviously require some skill on your part to carry out the thing you are demonstrating, but assuming you have that skill (or want to learn it) there is no reason to put your face in the frame.

If you are making a model house, you only need to show the house and the tools you are using. The same goes for cooking videos, and we can also throw things like repairing tech, and anything else small enough that you can carry out your task with your hands while otherwise staying out of shot.

How to Make Money on YouTube Reviewing Products

7. Product Reviews and Unboxing Videos

Not a million miles away from the last idea, unboxing and review videos don’t need you to be on camera either, and for those parts that benefit from your physical interaction, you can just have your hands in the shot!

This style of video works best with smaller items that can be handled, though you can review things of any size if you don’t need to physically touch it.

8. Point of View Content

This one is a little more out there, but point of view content is something that definitely has its place in the YouTube pantheon of niches.

Point of view videos are videos where the YouTuber straps a camera to their head and does things while the camera records, giving the viewers a first-hand look at what its like.

This style of video is very popular for things like extreme sports (see what it’s like to base jump from a skyscraper), but is also finding a home among the ambient experience YouTubers, with videos like “Relaxing Walk Through a Japanese Village” becoming increasingly common.

9. Interviews

If you can find the interesting enough subjects to interview, this could be your niche. Not only do you not need to have your face on screen for an interview video, it is often preferred that way. After all, the subject of the video is your interviewee, and the focus wants to be on them.

It’s worth remembering that the subject of your videos doesn’t need to be a celebrity or someone noteworthy to be good content. Think of the topic; there would be plenty of viewers interested in seeing a video with a power plant foreman talking about how it all works.

10. Animated Content

Now, granted, animation isn’t something you can just pick up straight away (though you can hire people to animate for you), but if it’s something you can do, there is a wealth of video types to take a crack at. You could make an animated show, animate yourself, do sketches, and any number of other types of content.

11. Compilation Videos

From top ten videos to endless clips of hilarious animal videos, compilation videos allow you to string together video content while keeping your face safely away from the lens.

Just be sure to make sure you have all the permissions you need to use what ever clips are going to feature in your videos.

12. Become a VTuber!

VTubers are being increasingly popular these days, so there’s clearly a growing market for it. VTubers are YouTubers who represent themselves with a digital avatar. This could be a posable 3D model, a live face-tracked image, or even a hand-drawn animation.

Many VTubers choose to create characters and make their videos as though the character is the YouTuber, while others just make content as themselves while using the digital avatar as a mask between them and the audience.

Final Thoughts

Hopefully we’ve made it abundantly clear that it is not necessary to show your face in a YouTube video to have a successful channel, and there is no shortage of ideas for what to do without your face being in shot.

In truth, as long as your videos deliver what the viewers are coming there for, your content has a good chance of succeeding, regardless of the style or whether your face is onscreen. The trick is working out what you are trying to deliver, and then honing in on the best way to deliver it within your chosen style.

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube

Very quickly before you go here are 5 amazing tools I have used every day to grow my YouTube channel from 0 to 30K subscribers in the last 12 months that I could not live without.

1. VidIQ helps boost my views and get found in search

I almost exclusively switched to VidIQ from a rival in 2020.

Within 12 months I tripled the size of my channel and very quickly learnt the power of thumbnails, click through rate and proper search optimization. Best of all, they are FREE!

2. Adobe Creative Suite helps me craft amazing looking thumbnails and eye-catching videos

I have been making youtube videos on and off since 2013.

When I first started I threw things together in Window Movie Maker, cringed at how it looked but thought “that’s the best I can do so it’ll have to do”.

Big mistake!

I soon realized the move time you put into your editing and the more engaging your thumbnails are the more views you will get and the more people will trust you enough to subscribe.

That is why I took the plunge and invested in my editing and design process with Adobe Creative Suite. They offer a WIDE range of tools to help make amazing videos, simple to use tools for overlays, graphics, one click tools to fix your audio and the very powerful Photoshop graphics program to make eye-catching thumbnails.

Best of all you can get a free trial for 30 days on their website, a discount if you are a student and if you are a regular human being it starts from as little as £9 per month if you want to commit to a plan.

3. Rev.com helps people read my videos

You can’t always listen to a video.

Maybe you’re on a bus, a train or sat in a living room with a 5 year old singing baby shark on loop… for HOURS. Or, you are trying to make as little noise as possible while your new born is FINALLY sleeping.

This is where Rev can help you or your audience consume your content on the go, in silence or in a language not native to the video.

Rev.com can help you translate your videos, transcribe your videos, add subtitles and even convert those subtitles into other languages – all from just $1.50 per minute.

A GREAT way to find an audience and keep them hooked no matter where they are watching your content.

4. Learn new skills for FREE with Skillshare

I SUCK reading books to learn, but I LOVE online video courses.

Every month I learn something new. Editing, writing, video skills, how to cook, how to run a business – even how to meditate to calm a busy mind.

I find all of these for FREE with Skillshare – Sign up, pick all the courses you want and cancel anytime you need.

5. Shutterstock helps me add amazing video b-roll cutaways

I mainly make tutorials and talking head videos.

And in this modern world this can be a little boring if you don’t see something funky every once in a while.

I try with overlays, jump cuts and being funny but my secret weapon is b-roll overlay content.

I can talk about skydiving, food, money, kids, cats – ANYTHING I WANT – with a quick search on the Shutterstock website I can find a great looking clip to overlay on my videos, keeping them entertained and watching for longer.

They have a wide library of videos, graphics, images and even a video maker tool and it wont break the bank with plans starting from as little as £8.25 ($9) per month.

Categories
HOW TO GET MORE VIEWS ON YOUTUBE TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE YOUTUBE TUTORIALS

Why Do YouTubers Zoom in and Out?

If you’ve ever watched a YouTuber in the conventional mould of YouTubers—the kind of frenetic, upbeat YouTuber who talks fast and stares directly into the camera in front of a carefully arranged background—you’ve probably noticed the way they frequently zoom in on their face. Perhaps you’ve even wondered why.

If you are an aspiring YouTuber, you hopefully have wondered why, since it is something that is used all over YouTube, implying there is a good reason for it.

But it is not enough to simply ape things you see if you want to be successful; you need to understand those things. Otherwise, you may find yourself using them wrong, and looking pretty silly in the process.

In this post, we are going to take a closer look (pun very much intended) at YouTubers’ tendency to zoom in and out during their videos, why they do it, what benefits it might have, and whether you should use it in your videos. So, without further preamble, let’s expose the truth!

Why do YouTubers zoom in and out? – Zooming in and out can help with the pace of the video and hide mistakes. You can also use it to add emphasis to something said like jokes or something dramatic. Zoom cuts can also make for a more distinct look and feel in some niches verses simple stand and shoot videos.

YouTube Best Time to Upload 4

Why Do YouTubers Zoom in and Out?

There are several reasons why YouTubers work zooming in and out into their videos, and we’re going take a look at some specific examples in a second, but we can confidently say that almost all of the time you see a zoom-in used in a YouTube video, it is for aesthetic reasons. This is a very broad reason, of course, but it covers just about every instance of using a zoom-in in a video. The aesthetics of your video play a huge part in how successful they are, so it makes sense that a popular technique for editing would be used by a lot of YouTubers. So let’s take a look at why it’s popular.

Hiding Cuts

Starting off with one of the least likely reasons a YouTuber might use this technique, zooming in and out can help to disguise cuts in the video. Any time you make a small cut in a video, it is incredibly obvious to the viewer if the scene remains the same. This is because you get an instant change from one frame to the next, and it is a little jarring for the viewer. If you change the next frame more substantially—for example, if you cut to a zoomed-in shot—the fact that the next frame is significantly different to the previous one makes the fact that there was a cut less obvious.

Now, we said that this is one of the least common reasons that a YouTuber might use zooming in their videos, and that is because jump cuts have become a regular part of YouTube, so there isn’t typically much of a need to hide them. Still, for the YouTubers who want to maintain a little more mystery about their editing process, this is one method to do that.

Emphasis

From time to time, a YouTuber will make a pointed facial expression. It may be during a video talking about current events, and the YouTuber has just mentioned someone doing something particularly silly, for example. In these instances, a quick zoom in on the YouTuber’s face adds emphasis to the moment, reinforcing the non-verbal opinion that the YouTuber is presenting.

Comedic Effect

This one is very similar to the above example of emphasis, with the main difference being that the expression the YouTuber is pulling does not have to be intentional. Sometimes the YouTuber will notice they have pulled an amusing face unintentionally and will use a zoom-in to draw attention to it. Usually, in these cases, it will be apparent that the YouTuber did not mean to make the face, and that they themselves are the butt of the joke.

Add Variety

If you’ve ever watched a mainstream news program, you might have noticed that they frequently cut from one angle to another. This is because having one continuous show for long periods quickly becomes monotonous, and the simple act of changing the camera angle breaks things up and makes it visually more interesting.

YouTubers faced the same problems when they started making vlog videos in the early days of the platform, but most people could not afford to purchase a multi-camera set up that would allow them to switch angles while recording. Indeed, many YouTubers can’t even afford a decent camera when they first start out, let alone multiple cameras.

Recording multiple takes of the same video with the camera in different positions is not a feasible alternative, especially since many videos are not scripted, and it would be almost impossible to ensure everything fit together coherently. And that is where zooming comes in.

In precisely the same way that cutting to different angles works, zooming in and out breaks up the content visually, adding a little interest and making things look less monotonous. And, since zooming can be done entirely digitally, it can be done with a single camera and one take, which is ideal for smaller YouTubers who don’t have thousands to spend on their camera setup.

Good Places to Record Videos in Your Home

Should I Use Zooming in my Videos?

The answer to this question is simple enough to say, not so simple to execute. Whether or not you should use zooming in your videos will be entirely determined by whether it adds anything to your content. If it doesn’t noticeably improve your content, there is no reason to add it.

Of course, improvement is a subjective term, and it may be that the “improvement” it makes is just that you prefer the look of the video. That is why we would always recommend getting second opinions whenever you can. Be sure to take those second opinions onboard, and get reasons for why your testers feel the way they do. It may be that, ultimately, you get second opinions on your new format and decide to go against the general consensus, but you should do so fully informed and aware of why the people who looked over your video said what they said.

Zooming Tips

If you are going to employ zooming in your videos, you might like a few tips on making the best use of it, so that’s exactly what we’ve got here.

Camera Quality

Okay, we know we said near the top that one of the reasons zooming became prevalent on YouTube was because YouTubers didn’t have the money for expensive multi-camera setups, so saying “get a good camera” might seem like a bad tip. Remember, these are just ways to improve and get the best video you can; if you can’t use one of these tips, don’t worry. It doesn’t mean you can’t use zooming in your videos.

But yes, camera quality. We’re assuming that you’re not planning to zoom in and out in real-time as you record, which means you’ll be doing it in the edit. If you have ever zoomed in on a picture (and, in these days of powerful handheld phones, who hasn’t?) you might have noticed that the more you zoom in, the worse the quality of the picture gets.

The same thing applies to video, which is essentially just a lot of images shown quickly one after the other. The closer you digitally zoom in to your face, the grainier and more pixellated your video will come. If you are starting off with an already grainy video, it’s going to get very bad.

It’s worth noting that some YouTubers do this intentionally as a stylistic choice. You may want to do this as well, but we can’t really guide you on artistic choices.

Don’t Overdo It

This should be fairly obvious to most of you, but over-using the zoom-in will quickly become tiresome to your viewers. Having a lot of zoom-ins in a short space of time for comedic effect may be fine, but if you bounce in and out continually throughout the whole video, you are going to annoy your viewers.

Don’t Get Too Close (or Not Close Enough)

If you zoom in so far that the viewers are getting nothing but a blurry close-up of your nose-pores, or you barely zoom in at all, and the view doesn’t appear to have perceptibly changed, you risk losing any benefit you might have gotten from the zoom-in, as well as making your video seem awkward and badly put together.

The right amount of zoom will depend on the effect you are going for, but if you are barely zooming in at all, you may want to ask yourself if a zoom-in is right for what you are doing at that point in the video.

Other Editing Tricks To Use

Zooming in is but one trick up the sleeve of your average YouTuber, and making use of a wide variety of techniques can help to give your video that special sauce that separates it from other videos in your niche.

We’ve talked at length about zooming in, but what of the other methods you commonly see on YouTube channels? We’ll save the details for a post on editing, but we thought we’d at least touch on some of the other methods here.

 

Jump Cut

Another technique that has become synonymous with YouTube is the jump cut. This involves cutting from one part of a video to another.

It is distinctive from a smash cut because it is not cutting to a new scene but rather skipping over something that has happened in this scene.

A common example is a vlogger talking directly to the camera who might cut out a bit they thought felt stilted or unnecessary, or even parts where they sneezed or messed up their lines. Jump cuts tend to add a sense of speed to a video since they cut out long pauses and things that might otherwise have broken up the flow of the content.

Funky Transitions

When you are transition from one scene to another, you might want to make use of interesting transitions, rather than just smash cutting from to the other. If you are using an application like Adobe Premiere, there will be a lot of built-in transitions that you can simply drag and drop into your video. Beware, however, these transitions can often appear tacky and cheap because of how often they have been used.

If you can tie your transitions into things that are happening in the video—a slide swipe timed to follow the swipe of a hand, for example—that can also add a nice touch to your content.

Sound Effects

This is another technique that belongs firmly in the category of “don’t overdo it,” but the occasional sound effect can add a little flavour to your videos. It might be something like adding the sound of a smashing plate when something is knocked off a table. In this case, the more unlikely it is that the knocked off thing would make that much noise, the better.

Using Silence

If you, like many, use background music in your videos, don’t be afraid to make creative use of silence in your videos. If you are talking over the music, and you suddenly mute the music at a certain bit of speech, the abrupt silence draws the attention of the viewer. This can be used for emphasis, but like sound effects, should not be over-used.

Final Thoughts

Zooming in and out, like jump cuts, smash cuts, and a host of other visual tools is just another way to add a little visual interest to your videos.

It just happens to be a method that can be achieved without the need for expensive equipment or professional-grade software, which is a massive part of why it has become so prevalent on YouTube—a platform that has been responsible for countless people who could not afford an expensive camera in the beginning making their fortune.

Like all visual tools, zooming in should not be over-used, as it will quickly become tiresome for your viewers, and maybe the reason they switch off. And, once you have lost a viewer because your video irritated them, they are as good as gone for good on a platform with as many options as YouTube.

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Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube

Growing on YouTube can be hard.

It’s even harder if you do all the heavy lifting yourself and not use tools to make your life easier.

It time to build yourself a YouTube toolkit that can help you make amazing eye catching content with minimal effort.

Here are the 5 tools I used EVERY day in the last 12 months to grow my YouTube channel from 0 to 30K subscribers.

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube

1. VidIQ helps boost my views and get found in search

I almost exclusively switched to VidIQ from a rival in 2020.

Within 12 months I tripled the size of my channel and very quickly learnt the power of thumbnails, click through rate and proper search optimization. Best of all, they are FREE!

VidIQ goes beyond just hammering in keywords and tweaking titles in the vain hope of getting more views.

Did you know you can compare your thumbnails to rivals?

A great way to see what the top competitors in your space is doing and gives you a jumping off point for when you make you next video on that topic.

Machine Learning based Automatic Content Creation ideas! 

Imagine waking up every day with a list of hot topics suggestions for you channel.

VidIQ has a new tool that will do the research for you, take a look at your niche, your rivals, your channel data and suggest topics that could be a good jumping off point for you in the future.

Never get stuck on what videos to make every again!

I could go on about the powers of VidIQ all day but that might derail this top 5 list, but I have made a blog post about the best VidIQ feature you might be sleeping on here.

I highly suggest you check out this real super weapon of a tool, it’s FREE, easy to use and packed full of tools you wish you had found sooner.

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube 1

2. Adobe Creative Suite helps me craft amazing looking thumbnails and eye-catching videos

I have been making youtube videos on and off since 2013.

When I first started I threw things together in Window Movie Maker, cringed at how it looked but thought “that’s the best I can do so it’ll have to do”.

Big mistake!

I soon realized the move time you put into your editing and the more engaging your thumbnails are the more views you will get and the more people will trust you enough to subscribe.

That is why I took the plunge and invested in my editing and design process with Adobe Creative Suite. They offer a WIDE range of tools to help make amazing videos, simple to use tools for overlays, graphics, one click tools to fix your audio and the very powerful Photoshop graphics program to make eye-catching thumbnails.

Best of all you can get a free trial for 30 days on their website, a discount if you are a student and if you are a regular human being it starts from as little as £9 per month if you want to commit to a plan.

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube 2

3. Rev.com helps people read my videos

You can’t always listen to a video.

Maybe you’re on a bus, a train or sat in a living room with a 5 year old singing baby shark on loop… for HOURS. Or, you are trying to make as little noise as possible while your new born is FINALLY sleeping.

This is where Rev can help you or your audience consume your content on the go, in silence or in a language not native to the video.

Rev.com can help you translate your videos, transcribe your videos, add subtitles and even convert those subtitles into other languages – all from just $1.50 per minute.

A GREAT way to find an audience and keep them hooked no matter where they are watching your content.

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube 3

4. PlaceIT can help you STAND OUT on YouTube

I SUCK at making anything flashy or arty.

I have every intention in the world to make something that looks cool but im about as artistic as a dropped ice-cream cone on the web windy day.

That is why I could not live on YouTube without someone like PlaceIT. They offer custom YouTube Banners, Avatars, YouTube Video Intros and YouTube End Screen Templates that are easy to edit with simple click, upload wizard to help you make amazing professional graphics in minutes.

Best of all, some of their templates are FREE! or you can pay a small fee if you want to go for their slightly more premium designs (pst – I always used the free ones).

Top 5 Tools To Get You Started on YouTube 4

5. StoryBlocks helps me add amazing video b-roll cutaways

I mainly make tutorials and talking head videos.

And in this modern world this can be a little boring if you don’t see something funky every once in a while.

I try with overlays, jump cuts and being funny but my secret weapon is b-roll overlay content.

I can talk about skydiving, food, money, kids, cats – ANYTHING I WANT – with a quick search on the StoryBlocks website I can find a great looking clip to overlay on my videos, keeping them entertained and watching for longer.

They have a wide library of videos, graphics, images and even a video maker tool and it wont break the bank with plans starting from as little as £8.25 ($9) per month.

BONUS TOOLS

Lowerthird, Call-to-Action Graphics – Need help with quick simple overlays, call to action, subscribe buttons, and social media links graphics – check out this mini bundle from my friends at the Underdog Collective.

The Underdog Collective was set up to help these people with easy to use, slick YouTube artwork that’s easily used with most desktop editing software.

High Quality, Low Cost Hosting – A great way to promote yourself, your videos and your brand is to have your own website.

I have been in the web development space for over 12 years and in that time the biggest lesson I have learnt from hundreds of clients is – a great website can be killed off by CRAPPY hosting, while an “okay” website with GREAT HOSTING can be a huge lead magnet for any project or product.

I recommend bluehost should you wish to start a website (or blog like this one) for a reasonable fee, with great expandability and top level reliability.

 

 

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DEEP DIVE ARTICLE HOW TO GET MORE VIEWS ON YOUTUBE TIPS & TRICKS YOUTUBE

Which Language is Best for YouTube?

The question of which language is best for YouTube is one with no universal answer that can be applied to every YouTuber in every region.

Ultimately, the best language is the one in which you can make videos coherently and comfortably, but there are other mitigating factors that can pull your choice of language this way or that.

In this post, we’re going to lay out all the different factors to consider when deciding what language (or languages) to release your videos in, as well as some alternatives to consider if you don’t speak the language that would be best for your particular videos.

How to Make Money on YouTube Without Showing Your Face

Most-Viewed Languages

Let’s start with the basics.

The raw numbers, as it were.

If you were purely concerned with reaching the largest possible audience on YouTube, you would naturally want to make content in the language that has the largest possible audience bases such as English Spanish and Hindi.

As per Twinword’s analysis of YouTube statistics, we can use the following numbers as a guide for how the languages are spread out on YouTube from the creator’s side, meaning this is the percentage of videos that are made in each language.

Language Percentage
English 66%
Spanish 15%
Portuguese 7%
Hindi 5%
Korean 2%
Others 5%

It’s worth remembering that these kinds of statistics change all the time, but there is unlikely to be a significant change in terms of the share of those languages. For example, Hindi could creep past Portuguese without much fanfare, but Spanish would be very unlikely to overtake English any time soon.

Still, these are the percentages in which YouTube content is made but do not necessarily reflect the percentages in terms of the potential audience. For example, English is a second language in many countries, and while the primary language of a given region may not be English, many people in that region will speak it, which would mean they could happily consume English-speaking content, even if they would be more comfortable with a different language.

From a practical standpoint, this detail doesn’t make much difference. If you are primarily concerned with reaching the largest possible audience, you would make your video in the language with the most potential viewers, even if not all of those viewers consider English their first language.

YouTube Audiences

So what of the audiences themselves? It is all well and good saying that the vast majority of the content on YouTube is made in English, but that is a creator bias and doesn’t necessarily reflect the language of the people who are watching that content.

There are no reliable statistics that we could find on language specifically when it comes to YouTube viewers, but there are statistics on things like region, which we can use to make a few educated guesses about the primary language of YouTube’s overall audience. Here are the top ten countries in terms of YouTube views (source).

Country Number of Views
USA 916 Billion
India 503 Billion
UK 391 Billion
Brazil 274 Billion
Thailand 207 Billion
Russia 207 Billion
South Korea 204 Billion
Spain 169 Billion
Japan 159 Billion
Canada 158 Billion

As you can see from this table, there is quite a diverse spread of nations in the top ten countries viewing YouTube. We can see English, Hindi, Portuguese, and Thai in the top five languages, with plenty of other languages in the rest. Russian, Korean, Spanish, and Japanese.

However, things are not as diverse as they may first appear. For one thing, the three overwhelmingly English-speaking countries in that top ten—the USA, the UK, and Canada—account for 45% of the total views in that table. Granted, 45% is not a majority, but remember that none of the other countries in the top ten shares a primary language. India mainly speaks Hindi, Thailand primarily speaks Thai, Russia speaks Russian, South Korea speaks Korean, Spain speaks Spanish, and Japan speaks Japanese.

Further muddying the waters is the multilingual nature of some nations. For example, India lists both Hindi and English as their official languages, although it is thought that only around ten percent of India’s residents speak English. Still, India is second in our table with over half a trillion views—a potential ten percent bump of that half trillion for English is substantial.

It is also worth noting that, while the vast majority of Canada can speak English, they also have French as an official language, and around a fifth of the population can speak it.

So, what do we take from this? The first thing to take away from all of these numbers is that there is no clear cut statistic or table we can look at that will tell us which language has the most potential YouTube viewers. We can look at the languages which content is made in, but that doesn’t tell us if people are watching content in a language they are not fluent in. We can also look at the nations with the most YouTube viewers, but that doesn’t tell us what language the viewers are watching in.

If you are looking for a single broadest appeal language to make your content in, it is hard to argue with English, which makes sense as YouTube came from and rose to prominence in English-speaking countries.

How to Record YouTube Video Outside 5

Working With What You Got

All of the numbers and statistics on which languages are most viewed on YouTube may be irrelevant to you. If you only speak one language, or you can speak another language, but it is difficult to understand, you will struggle to make content in those other languages.

The first gatekeeper along your road to YouTube success is how watchable your content is. You could manoeuvre your videos to be in front of the largest potential audience possible, but if it is not watchable, you will not succeed. The phrase “content is key” may be cliched at this point, but it is cliched for a reason. It is 100% true.

If you have lofty ambitions for your YouTube channel, you may consider learning a language so that you can make content in that language.

For some people, learning a new language is intuitive. They can pick up the structure of the language relatively easy and, with some time and practice, speak the language with more clarity than even some native speakers of that language. On the other hand, there are people who have moved to a foreign country and lived there for most of their life and still have thick accents that make them hard to understand when speaking the local language.

This isn’t a linguistics blog, so we won’t pretend to know the reasons some people can pick up new languages easily and others cannot, but if you are the latter—if no amount of speaking a particular language makes it feel comfortable on your tongue—you would be better placed putting your energies into making the best possible content you can in your own language.

There are other options, of course, but more on that below.

How Important Is Language to Success on YouTube?

This is an important question to ask yourself because the work involved in making your content available in a language other than the one you are comfortable with—especially if you are going to learn a whole new language just so you can speak it in your videos—is considerable.

It is important to establish a realistic sense of what “success” means for you when starting out on YouTube. If your idea of success is being able to pay the bills and live comfortably with the revenue generated from your YouTube channel, you probably don’t need to conquer the world. If we take the data from the top countries viewing YouTube above, the twenty-fifth country on the list—Romania—still accounts for an impressive 63 billion views. The average CPM (the amount you make per one thousand views) on YouTube is typically around the £2-4 mark (after YouTube takes its cut). If we go for the middle ground and assume you will make roughly $3 per thousand views, and we take the average US monthly salary of around $3,500, we can say that you would need to get around 1,200,000 monthly views to match the average US citizen’s salary.

Without a doubt, 1.2 million views per month is a lot, but it is only approximately 0.002% of the total views coming from Romania. Would it be harder to get that many views from a purely Romanian audience than the much larger English audience? Of course. But it is certainly an attainable goal.

Of course, if your idea of success is to conquer the world of YouTube and overtake PewDiePie as the most successful individual YouTuber, that’s different. You’re probably going to need to make videos in English to do that.

At least, for now.

Translations/Captions

We mentioned alternatives to settling for your own language or learning a new one, so let’s talk about that. Making your content available to other languages doesn’t necessarily mean creating that content in those languages.

First of all, YouTube makes it very easy to caption your videos in multiple languages, even to the point that they have an automated captioning service that, while not perfect, is getting better all the time. There are also many transcription and translation services on the web for very affordable rates—typically a dollar or two per minute of audio. Captioning your videos is a good practice to get into regardless of language because it makes your video more accessible to people with hearing problems, but it also provides a way to make your content more accessible to other languages.

The other option is to have your videos translated and recorded so that you can upload alternate language versions of your videos with the translated voice-over dubbed onto it. There are services that will take care of the translation and voice over for you, or you might choose to have the translation handled separately, such as if you have a particular voice-over person you want to work with, but that person doesn’t do the translation.

If you go down the route of alternative language versions of your videos, it is important to make it clear that you have those alternative versions out there. First impressions tend to stick on YouTube, and if someone comes to your video because the content of the video is exactly what they are looking for, but they land on a version of the video using a language they don’t speak, they may dismiss you entirely because they can’t speak that language. Always put links to alternative language versions of a video in the descriptions of those videos, and it would be wise to have some kind of note in the video at the start mentioning that the video is available in other languages.

Final Thoughts

In an ideal world, you would not be concerned with the global reach of your videos. You would make the content you want to make to the best of your ability, continually looking for ways to improve and grow and let the views pan out how they may. That being said, we understand that reality is rarely ideal.

There is nothing inherently wrong with wanting to reach viewers in the largest markets, but it is important to ensure your content is good. Creating a hard to understand video in English when your native language is Japanese, for example, will not just not help your channel; it may actively harm it. If you get a reputation for creating videos that are hard to understand, the people who would have watched that content in the first place may not come back when you have improved further down the line.

If you are learning a new language, use your time making content in your first language to improve and grow as a YouTuber, and hold off on making content in your additional language until you can speak it fluently and clearly.

And, remember; there are plenty of views out there no matter what language you speak.